Google Sites & Chrome for Dummies


Ryan Teeter Karl Barksdale Coauthors of Google Apps For Dummies Learn to: • Use Google Sites to easily create Web pages with wikis • Share information with teams, colleagues, or family members • Download and install the speedy Google Chrome browser Inside — your Google AdWords™ gift card worth $25 Google™ Sites & Chrome Making Everything Easier! ™ Open the book and find: • Where Google Sites beats other team site packages • How to create a Google account or Google Apps account • Advice on setting up sites that work • Tips for managing collaborators • Chrome’s better way of fixing unruly tabs • Steps to take when designing a scheme • Why you should consider Gmail Ryan Teeter was an external trainer for Google, where he developed a comprehensive training program for corporate customers and Google Apps users. Karl Barksdale has written more than 50 business and technology books, and has consulted for both Microsoft and Google. $24.99 US / $29.99 CN / £16.99 UK ISBN 978-0-470-39678-0 Business Software/General Go to dummies.com® for more! Boost your bottom line with your $25 Google AdWords credit — see inside When you hear “Google”, do you think “search”? Most people do. But Google is much more, and you won’t have to search far to get the scoop. This book shows you how to create great collaborative Web sites with Google Sites and surf the Web with the super-fast Google Chrome browser. You can even boost your business with Google AdWords — look inside for more! • Simple and free — take advantage of free hosting, free tools, and a simple, straightforward interface with Google Sites • Wonderful wikis — create wiki sites that let coworkers collaborate on projects and keep family members up to date • A gaggle of gadgets — use Google gadgets to keep track of projects, manage calendars and documents, or display photos • Take a shine to Chrome — create a highly efficient, personalized browser using tabs and shortcuts • Sample a scheme — explore sample schemes for a personal site, business intranet, or college course site • Tinker — install browser plug-ins, enable offline access to Google Docs, and manage misbehaving tabs • Applicable applications — integrate documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and other Google Apps into your site Google ™ Sites & Chrome Teeter Barksdale spine=.912” Google™ Sites & Chrome FOR DUMmIES‰ by Ryan Teeter and Karl Barksdale Google™ Sites & Chrome FOR DUMmIES‰ Google Sites™ & Chrome For Dummies® Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc. 111 River Street Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774 www.wiley.com Copyright © 2009 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana Published simultaneously in Canada No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permit- ted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 646-8600. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, (201) 748-6011, fax (201) 748-6008, or online at http:// www.wiley.com/go/permissions. Trademarks: Wiley, the Wiley Publishing logo, For Dummies, the Dummies Man logo, A Reference for the Rest of Us!, The Dummies Way, Dummies Daily, The Fun and Easy Way, Dummies.com, Making Everything Easier, and related trade dress are trademarks or registered trademarks of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and/ or its affi liates in the United States and other countries, and may not be used without written permission. Google, Google Chrome, and Google Sites are trademarks of Google, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Wiley Publishing, Inc., is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book. 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Library of Congress Control Number: 2008943768 ISBN: 978-0-470-39678-0 Manufactured in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 About the Authors Ryan Teeter is an accomplished writer and technology trainer. He has worked closely with business teachers throughout the country and consulted with the National Business Education Association, businesses, and school districts on Google Apps implementation. Ryan spent time working at Google in Mountain View, California as an External Training Specialist, developing curriculum used for training Fortune 500 companies. When he’s not conducting training workshops or writing, Ryan’s pursu- ing his passion for teaching and research as a doctoral student at Rutgers University, where he’s completing a Ph.D. in accounting information systems. (www.ryanteeter.com) Karl Barksdale was a former Development Manager for the Training and Certifi cation team at WordPerfect Corporation and a Marketing Manager in the Consumer Products division. He was also the External Training Manager for Google’s Online Sales and Operations division. He’s best known for authoring and co-authoring 59 business and computer education textbooks. Albeit, the job he enjoys most is teaching at the Utah County Academy of Sciences, an early college high school on the Utah Valley University campus. (www.karlbarksdale.com) Dedication Ryan Teeter: This book is dedicated to Erin, the love of my life. Karl Barksdale: For Hilary, Cory, and Mari, who make it all worthwhile. Authors’ Acknowledgments This book wouldn’t have happened without the inspiration and guidance of Esther Wojcicki of Palo Alto High School and Jeremy Milo, the Google Apps Product Marketing Manager at Google. Nor could we have accomplished so much without the External Training Team at Google, of which we were so fortunate to be a part. Here’s to Lance Cotton, Erik Gottlieb, Lauren Frandsen, Kristina Cutura, Charbel Semaan, Tyrona Heath, Mary Hekl, Brian Schreier, and Jared Smith. You guys rock! We also want to give special recognition to our outstanding team at Wiley Publishing, including Greg Croy, senior acquisitions editor; Chris Morris, senior project editor; Brian Walls, copy editor; Jim Kelly, technical editor and the other incredibly talented and amazing people who made working on this project a real treat. Along those lines, we want to acknowledge our friends and colleagues at the Rutgers Business School and the Utah County Academy of Sciences for their support. Finally, we acknowledge you, the reader, for trusting us to help you make the most out of this amazing and incredibly useful technology. Publisher’s Acknowledgments We’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online registration form located at http://dummies.custhelp.com. For other comments, please contact our Customer Care Department within the U.S. at 877-762-2974, outside the U.S. at 317-572-3993, or fax 317-572-4002. Some of the .people who helped bring this book to market include the following: Acquisitions and Editorial Sr. Project Editor: Christopher Morris Sr. Acquisitions Editor: Gregory Croy Copy Editor: Brian Walls Technical Editor: James Kelly Editorial Manager: Kevin Kirschner Editorial Assistant: Amanda Foxworth Sr. Editorial Assistant: Cherie Case Cartoons: Rich Tennant (www.the5thwave.com) Composition Services Project Coordinator: Kristie Rees Layout and Graphics: Claudia Bell, Reuben W. Davis, Ana Carrillo, Christine Williams Proofreader: Bonnie Mikkelson Indexer: Broccoli Information Management Publishing and Editorial for Technology Dummies Richard Swadley, Vice President and Executive Group Publisher Andy Cummings, Vice President and Publisher Mary Bednarek, Executive Acquisitions Director Mary C. Corder, Editorial Director Publishing for Consumer Dummies Diane Graves Steele, Vice President and Publisher Composition Services Gerry Fahey, Vice President of Production Services Debbie Stailey, Director of Composition Services Contents at a Glance Introduction ................................................................ 1 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome .....7 Chapter 1: Befriending Google Sites ................................................................................9 Chapter 2: Getting to Know Chrome .............................................................................21 Chapter 3: Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online ...................31 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites .................................................................................43 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site ...... 63 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools ............................................................65 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets .............................................................................................85 Chapter 7: Customizing Your Site’s Look and Feel ....................................................103 Chapter 8: Bringing Collaboration to a New Level ....................................................115 Part III: Getting the Most Out of Chrome ................... 129 Chapter 9: Perfecting Chrome Browsing ....................................................................131 Chapter 10: Uncovering Chrome’s Advanced Features ............................................151 Part IV: Building Your Own Scheme .......................... 173 Chapter 11: Proffering a Personal Scheme .................................................................175 Chapter 12: Building a College Course Scheme .........................................................185 Chapter 13: Building Business Schemes .....................................................................201 Part V: More Google Apps You Can’t Do Without ........ 219 Chapter 14: Using Google Docs and the Docs Home .................................................221 Chapter 15: Docs: Google’s Word-Processing App ....................................................239 Chapter 16: Calculating with Google Spreadsheets...................................................271 Chapter 17: Creating Amazing Google Presentations ...............................................297 Chapter 18: Using Google Calendar .............................................................................323 Chapter 19: Communicating with Gmail .....................................................................347 Chapter 20: Enhancing Communication with Google Contacts, Video Chat, and Talk ...................................................................................................371 Part VI: The Part of Tens .......................................... 391 Chapter 21: Ten More Ideas for Your Scheme ...........................................................393 Chapter 22: Ten More Google Apps for Your Team ..................................................401 Index ...................................................................... 407 Table of Contents Introduction ................................................................. 1 About This Book ..............................................................................................1 How This Book Is Organized ..........................................................................2 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome ......................2 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site...........................2 Part III: Getting the Most Out of Chrome ............................................2 Part IV: Building Your Own Scheme ....................................................3 Part V: More Google Apps You Can’t Do Without .............................3 Part VI: The Part of Tens .......................................................................3 Conventions Used in This Book .....................................................................3 Icons Used In This Book .................................................................................4 Where to Go from Here ...................................................................................5 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome ..... 7 Chapter 1: Befriending Google Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 What You Should Know Before You Start ....................................................9 Web pages .............................................................................................10 Wikis ......................................................................................................11 File sharing ...........................................................................................11 Comparing Google Sites to Other Team Sites ............................................13 Microsoft Offi ce Live Workspace .......................................................13 Blackboard and Moodle ......................................................................14 Acrobat ..................................................................................................14 Why Google Sites Is the Right Way to Do Things ......................................15 Simplifying your life .............................................................................15 Saving money .......................................................................................16 How Google Sites Fits with the Other Google Apps ..................................16 Calendar ................................................................................................17 Docs .......................................................................................................17 Gmail ......................................................................................................18 Talk ........................................................................................................19 Chapter 2: Getting to Know Chrome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Choosing Google Chrome .............................................................................21 Using a faster browser ........................................................................22 Making the most of Google Search ....................................................23 Keeping your computer safe ..............................................................24 Google Sites and Chrome For Dummies xiv Downloading and Installing Chrome ...........................................................24 Finding Your Way around Chrome ..............................................................26 Discovering tabs ..................................................................................27 New Tab page .......................................................................................28 Unleashing the Omnibox .....................................................................29 Chapter 3: Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Creating a Google Account ...........................................................................32 Signing up for a Google account using your existing e-mail address ...................................................................................33 Signing up for a Google account using Gmail ...................................34 Creating a Google Apps Account .................................................................36 Logging In and Finding Your Way around the Dashboard .......................38 Launching your Google Apps .............................................................38 Inviting other users to join Google Apps ..........................................39 Customizing your apps appearance ..................................................40 Changing your password ....................................................................42 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Opening Your Sites ........................................................................................43 Navigating your Google Sites Home ..................................................44 Browsing other sites in your domain ................................................45 Accepting a site invitation ..................................................................46 Getting back to your Google Sites Home ..........................................47 Knowing your role ...............................................................................47 Creating a New Site ........................................................................................48 Editing Pages on Your Site ...........................................................................49 Using the Edit buttons .........................................................................50 Checking out your page elements .....................................................51 Using the right toolbar for the job .....................................................51 Applying Text Formatting to Your Page .....................................................53 Changing your body text style ...........................................................54 Adding emphasis..................................................................................54 Removing unwanted formats .............................................................55 Creating lists .........................................................................................55 Aligning your paragraphs ...................................................................55 Power formatting with styles, superscripts, subscripts, and more ...........................................................................................56 Inserting Images, Links, Table of Contents, Lines, and Other Gadgets .....................................................................................57 Adding images .....................................................................................57 Linking to other pages .........................................................................59 Adding a table of contents ..................................................................59 Inserting horizontal lines ....................................................................60 Fitting Your Stuff in Tables ...........................................................................60 Fitting More Stuff on Your Page ...................................................................61 xv Table of Contents Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site ....... 63 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Adding New Pages to Your Site ...................................................................66 Adjusting page settings .......................................................................68 Working with attachments .................................................................69 Making comments ................................................................................70 Designing a Web Page ...................................................................................71 Steering toward a Dashboard ......................................................................72 Adding gadgets .....................................................................................74 Adjusting gadgets ................................................................................74 Deleting gadgets ...................................................................................75 Using Announcements ..................................................................................75 Writing a new post ...............................................................................76 Dealing with drafts ...............................................................................77 Deleting old announcements ..............................................................77 Filling Your File Cabinet ................................................................................78 Adding fi les ...........................................................................................79 Organizing fi les .....................................................................................80 Deleting fi les .........................................................................................80 Tracking fi les ........................................................................................80 Following changes to your File Cabinet ............................................81 Tracking Projects Using Lists ......................................................................81 Customizing your list ..........................................................................82 Adding list items ..................................................................................83 Updating list items ...............................................................................83 Deleting list items ................................................................................84 Sorting your lists ..................................................................................84 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Inserting Gadgets ...........................................................................................85 Meshing Content from Other Pages on Your Site ......................................87 Incorporating announcements ...........................................................87 Previewing the File Cabinet ................................................................88 Abbreviating your lists ........................................................................89 Creating your own textbox .................................................................90 Sharing Information from Other Google Apps ...........................................90 Showing a calendar on your site ........................................................90 Presenting a document, spreadsheet, or presentation...................92 Gather information with a spreadsheet form ...................................95 Grabbing Video and Photos from the Web ................................................97 Showing video to your group with YouTube or Google Video ......97 Viewing slideshows with Picasa Web ................................................98 Browsing the Google Gadgets Directory ....................................................99 Checking out the gadget directory ..................................................100 Seeing what’s happening on your personal calendar ...................101 Viewing your latest docs ...................................................................102 Chatting with your contacts .............................................................102 Google Sites and Chrome For Dummies xvi Chapter 7: Customizing Your Site’s Look and Feel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 Sticking with a Theme .................................................................................104 Working Magic with Site Elements ............................................................105 Changing your site layout .................................................................106 Choosing your site logo ....................................................................107 Adding Sidebar elements ..................................................................109 Changing Sidebar elements ..............................................................111 Sprinkling a Dash of Color and Fonts ........................................................111 Chapter 8: Bringing Collaboration to a New Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Defi ning Relationships ................................................................................115 Sending invitations to others ...........................................................116 Advanced permissions ......................................................................118 Removing users from your site ........................................................118 Seeing Your Site Through a Viewer’s Eyes ...............................................119 Tracking File Changes .................................................................................120 Viewing a past version of your page ...............................................121 Comparing different page versions .................................................122 Reverting to an older version ...........................................................123 Keeping Tabs on Page and Site Updates ..................................................123 Subscribing to individual page changes .........................................124 Watching for site changes ................................................................124 Managing subscriptions ..............................................................................125 Part III: Getting the Most Out of Chrome ....................129 Chapter 9: Perfecting Chrome Browsing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 Teaching Chrome Your Habits ..................................................................131 Try the 60-second start .....................................................................132 Play the Tab shuffl e ...........................................................................134 Tips on the toolbar ............................................................................134 Using the Page menu ...................................................................................135 Going incognito: James Bond’s browser .........................................136 Create application shortcuts ............................................................136 Zoom, zoom, zoom ............................................................................139 The right-click menu ..........................................................................139 Power over popups ...........................................................................139 Getting the Most from the Fastest Bookmarks in Browser Town .........140 Single-click bookmarks ......................................................................140 Refi ning and editing your bookmarks .............................................141 The Bookmarks Bar and optional folders .......................................141 Place your bookmarks in folders .....................................................142 Deleting bookmarks ...........................................................................143 Always show the Bookmarks bar? ...................................................143 xvii Table of Contents Use the Tools Menu .....................................................................................143 History .................................................................................................144 Downloading fi les ...............................................................................145 Clear browsing data ...........................................................................146 Import bookmarks and settings from IE or Firefox .......................147 Search Effectively with Chrome’s Omnibox .............................................147 Chapter 10: Uncovering Chrome’s Advanced Features . . . . . . . . . . . .151 Dealing with Plug-Ins ...................................................................................151 Installing plug-ins automatically ......................................................151 Installing plug-ins manually ..............................................................152 Enabling Offl ine Access to Google Docs ...................................................153 Going offl ine ........................................................................................154 Turning Offl ine off ..............................................................................155 Managing Unruly Tabs ................................................................................155 Adjusting Options ........................................................................................157 Setting Basics .....................................................................................158 Making Minor Tweaks .......................................................................162 Getting under the hood .....................................................................166 Starting over .......................................................................................170 Part IV: Building Your Own Scheme ...........................173 Chapter 11: Proffering a Personal Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175 Going Solo or Keeping It All in the Family ................................................176 Keeping your site to yourself ...........................................................176 Gathering your family together ........................................................177 Showing Your Face to the World: Adding Your Profi le Info ...................178 Sharing Your Life Experiences ...................................................................179 Adding a photo gadget or two ..........................................................179 Broadcasting yourself .......................................................................181 Creating a virtual fridge ....................................................................181 Keeping track of To-Do lists and digits ...........................................182 Planning that trip of a lifetime ..........................................................183 Entertaining Your Visitors with Gadgets ..................................................183 Chapter 12: Building a College Course Scheme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185 Analyzing College Course Schemes ...........................................................185 Considering site elements and gathering ideas .............................186 Looking at Web page, File Cabinet, and List page templates .......187 Sketching your pages and diagramming your sitemap .................189 Setting Site Settings .....................................................................................190 Setting up site rights and security ...................................................190 Picking a name and defi ning your site settings ..............................192 Improving your site’s appearance ...................................................192 Google Sites and Chrome For Dummies xviii Adding Web Page, File Cabinet, and List Page Elements ........................196 Adding a gadget to a Web page ........................................................197 Adding images ....................................................................................197 Adding a File Cabinet .........................................................................198 Adding a List page .............................................................................199 Chapter 13: Building Business Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201 Google’s Advertising Tools ........................................................................201 Google’s Other Business Tools for Intranets ...........................................202 Using All of the Sites Template Options ...................................................203 The Web page template on an intranet ...........................................204 The Announcements template on an intranet ...............................206 The File Cabinet template on an intranet .......................................206 The List template on an intranet .....................................................208 The Dashboard template on an intranet .........................................208 Creating a Common Start Page for Lost Souls .........................................210 Analyzing a sample start page..........................................................210 Linking to Google Sites from a start page .......................................211 View Your Sitemap and Link to Sub-Pages ...............................................213 Setting Site Settings .....................................................................................215 More technical settings .....................................................................216 Matching your site’s appearance to your company brand ..........216 Part V: More Google Apps You Can’t Do Without .........219 Chapter 14: Using Google Docs and the Docs Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . .221 Previewing Google Docs .............................................................................221 Advantages of Docs .....................................................................................222 Using the Google Docs Home .....................................................................225 Creating, saving, naming, and renaming fi les .................................225 Searching for fi les ..............................................................................226 Viewing, sorting, hiding, and trashing fi les ....................................227 Uploading and converting your existing fi les .................................230 Singledocumindedness for Sharing, Collaboration, and Revision Tracking ....................................................................................231 Revision History tracks changes by you and your collaborators ..................................................................................231 Organizing your fi les by folders or labels .......................................232 Sharing and collaborating .................................................................233 Converting and exporting docs into other fi le formats ................237 Changing your language settings .....................................................237 Using Help and signing out of Google Docs ....................................238 xix Table of Contents Chapter 15: Docs: Google’s Word-Processing App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239 Starting Simply with Google Docs .............................................................239 Exploring the basic tools ..................................................................240 Watching the toolbar buttons ..........................................................241 Simply Saving, Renaming, and Printing Google Docs ..............................244 Simply Editing and Viewing Documents ...................................................245 Checking your spelling ......................................................................245 Basic editing commands on the Edit menu ....................................245 Undoing mistakes...............................................................................246 Cutting, copying, and pasting ...........................................................246 Finding and replacing words or phrases ........................................246 Viewing options..................................................................................246 Simply Formatting Documents ..................................................................247 Changing font size, style, text color, and highlight color .............248 Bold, italic, and underline .................................................................248 Removing pesky formats...................................................................249 Numbered and bulleted lists ............................................................249 Understanding default margins ........................................................249 Decrease or increase indentions .....................................................250 Aligning to the left, right, and center of a doc ...............................250 Power Formatting with Styles, Superscripts, Subscripts, and More ....250 More Powerful Keyboard Shortcuts ..........................................................251 Powerfully Inserting Elements ...................................................................252 Inserting pictures ...............................................................................253 Making links ........................................................................................255 Sticking a bookmark in your document ..........................................256 Inserting comments ...........................................................................256 Inserting special characters .............................................................257 Inserting horizontal lines and page breaks ....................................258 Inserting headers and footers ..........................................................258 Building Powerful Tables ............................................................................259 Optional table settings ......................................................................260 Editing tables ......................................................................................261 Power Converting, Saving, and Adjusting Doc Options ..........................262 Downloading and converting Google Docs into other types of fi les .........................................................................262 Saving new copies, reviewing revisions, and deleting ..................263 Print Settings: Orientation, margins,paper size, and page numbering ......................................................................263 Changing document settings ............................................................264 The Tools and Help menus ...............................................................265 Publishing to Sites and Other Places ........................................................266 Publish a document online ...............................................................266 Publishing to a blog ...........................................................................267 Sharing, Collaborating, and Working Offl ine ............................................268 Google Sites and Chrome For Dummies xx Chapter 16: Calculating with Google Spreadsheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . .271 Starting Up a Spreadsheet ..........................................................................271 Start autosaving immediately ...........................................................272 Getting familiar with Spreadsheets’ header, menus, and tabs .............................................................................273 Entering values and moving around ................................................274 Selecting multiple cells .....................................................................276 Formatting multiple cells ..................................................................277 Changing the column width or row height .....................................277 Entering sequences quickly with the Fill Handle ...........................278 Changing values and undoing mistakes ..........................................278 Inserting new rows or columns ........................................................279 Merging and aligning cells ................................................................279 Deleting rows and columns ..............................................................280 Formatting numbers ..........................................................................280 Freezing rows and columns ..............................................................281 Sorting from A to Z and Z to A..........................................................282 Using Charts, Graphs, and Diagrams ........................................................283 Defi ning a range of data for your chart ...........................................283 Creating a chart ..................................................................................284 Managing charts .................................................................................285 Creating gadgets and maps ..............................................................286 Formula Fixin’ ...............................................................................................287 Using cell references and selecting a range ...................................288 Built-in functions ................................................................................289 Filling and incrementing formulas ...................................................290 Advanced and creative online formulas ........................................291 Creating multiple sheets ...................................................................292 Sharing and Collaborating with Spreadsheets .........................................293 Discuss while you work.....................................................................293 Revisions and version control .........................................................294 Converting and Exporting to Other File Formats ....................................294 Publishing and Printing Spreadsheets ......................................................295 Chapter 17: Creating Amazing Google Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . .297 Starting Up Presentations ...........................................................................297 Getting familiar with the header, menus, and tabs .......................298 The all-important Toolbar ................................................................299 Adding Text, Themes, Shapes, Video, and Images to Slides ..................301 Making a new slide .............................................................................301 Changing the placeholder text .........................................................302 Changing themes................................................................................302 Inserting textboxes and formatting text .........................................303 Inserting links .....................................................................................305 Clean up with Cut, Copy, and Paste ................................................306 xxi Table of Contents Inserting shapes .................................................................................306 Inserting images .................................................................................306 Inserting video clips ..........................................................................308 Organizing Slides .........................................................................................308 Using the File Menu to Full Advantage .....................................................309 Renaming a presentation ..................................................................310 Printing the show ...............................................................................310 Saving a PDF copy of your presentation .........................................311 Uploading existing PowerPoint presentations ...............................311 Integrating other slides into a show ................................................312 Viewing Revisions ........................................................................................313 Giving Your Presentation ...........................................................................313 Projecting your slideshow ................................................................313 Inviting collaborators and viewers ..................................................315 Leading an Online Web presentation ..............................................316 Discussing the presentation with your audience ..........................318 Relinquishing control ........................................................................319 Sharing and Publishing a Presentation .....................................................319 E-mail a presentation .........................................................................319 Nervous? Add speaker notes ............................................................320 Publishing a presentation .................................................................321 Chapter 18: Using Google Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .323 Using Calendar .............................................................................................323 Creating and changing events ..........................................................324 Moving your events around .............................................................326 Deleting events ...................................................................................327 Setting Up Calendar Notifi cations .............................................................327 Creating universal event reminders ................................................327 Registering your mobile phone to receive notifi cations...............328 Adding reminders to individual events ...........................................330 Changing Your Calendar Views .................................................................330 Printing Your Calendar ...............................................................................331 Using Multiple Calendars ............................................................................332 Adding calendars ...............................................................................332 Changing colors and settings ...........................................................333 Searching Your Calendar ............................................................................335 Sharing Invitations with Others .................................................................336 Creating invitations ...........................................................................336 Responding to invitations .................................................................337 Checking guest status and e-mailing guests ...................................338 Sending invitations directly from Gmail .........................................338 Making a Calendar Available to Others ....................................................339 Sharing options ..................................................................................340 Sharing with specifi c people ............................................................341 Google Sites and Chrome For Dummies xxii Scheduling Resources .................................................................................342 Using Calendar on Your Mobile Device ....................................................344 Using Google Calendar for Mobile ...................................................344 Scheduling with SMS .........................................................................345 Chapter 19: Communicating with Gmail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .347 Setting Up E-Mail ..........................................................................................347 Starting Gmail ...............................................................................................348 Getting to Know the Inbox ..........................................................................348 Composing Mail ...........................................................................................349 Composing and formatting messages .............................................351 Attaching fi les .....................................................................................351 Sending, saving, or discarding .........................................................352 Stacking Up a Gmail Conversation ............................................................352 Collapsing and expanding stacks .....................................................354 Marking important messages ...........................................................354 Searching Your Messages ...........................................................................355 Opening Attachments .................................................................................356 Creating Signatures and Vacation Responses .........................................357 Adding a signature .............................................................................357 Turning the vacation responder on and off ...................................358 Using Labels and Filters ..............................................................................359 Labeling your messages ....................................................................359 Creating new fi lters ............................................................................360 Adjusting fi lters later .........................................................................363 Alternative Access: Forwarding, POP/IMAP, and Mobile .......................364 Turning forwarding on and off .........................................................364 Sending mail from different accounts .............................................365 Activating POP or IMAP ....................................................................366 Confi guring Outlook to work with Gmail ........................................367 Accessing Gmail from your mobile device .....................................369 Chapter 20: Enhancing Communication with Google Contacts, Chat, and Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .371 Growing Your Contacts List ......................................................................371 Viewing your contacts .......................................................................372 Rolling through your Contacts list ..................................................373 Using Quick Contacts in Gmail ...................................................................374 Knowing when your contacts are online ........................................374 Prioritizing Quick Contacts ..............................................................374 Unearthing lost contacts ...................................................................375 Adding or Updating Contacts .....................................................................376 Entering basic contact information .................................................376 Adding more information about a contact .....................................377 Adding a picture .................................................................................378 xxiii Table of Contents Sorting Contacts into Groups .....................................................................380 Creating groups ..................................................................................380 Viewing and editing an existing group ............................................381 E-mailing a group ...............................................................................381 Understanding Gmail Chat and Google Talk ............................................381 Inviting someone to chat in Gmail Chat ..........................................382 Chatting away in Gmail Chat ............................................................383 Starting a voice/video chat ...............................................................384 Changing your Chat status ...............................................................385 Accessing Google Talk ................................................................................386 Inviting a contact to chat in Google Talk ........................................387 Chatting with a contact in Google Talk ...........................................387 Chatting with a group ........................................................................388 Making a call .......................................................................................389 Sending a voice mail ..........................................................................390 Part VI: The Part of Tens ...........................................391 Chapter 21: Ten More Ideas for Your Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .393 Family Scheme .............................................................................................393 Little League Scheme ..................................................................................394 Book Club Scheme .......................................................................................394 Corporate Retreat Scheme .........................................................................395 Newsletter Scheme ......................................................................................396 Group or Team Project Scheme .................................................................396 Homeroom Scheme .....................................................................................397 Political Scheme ...........................................................................................397 Investment Club Scheme ............................................................................398 Your Scheme Here .......................................................................................399 Chapter 22: Ten More Google Apps for Your Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .401 1-800-GOOG-411 ...........................................................................................402 AdWords .......................................................................................................402 AdSense ........................................................................................................403 Google Notebook .........................................................................................403 Google Finance .............................................................................................403 Google Product Search ...............................................................................403 Google Reader ..............................................................................................404 Google Maps .................................................................................................404 Google Pack ..................................................................................................405 Google Translate ..........................................................................................406 Index ....................................................................... 407 Google Sites and Chrome For Dummies xxiv Introduction When most people think of Google, the first thing that comes to mind is Internet search. Millions of people around the globe use Google to find information, learn something new, explore issues, or discover answers to tough questions. We assume that you’ve used Google Search before — or at least heard of it. If you want to find out how to be a Google Search expert, you’ve come to the wrong place. We’re interested in the other cool tools that Google creates beyond its powerful search box. Google Sites and Chrome are two such tools. Just so you know upfront, Google Sites is a free online service that allows you to easily create Web sites with powerful wiki, file sharing, and collabora- tion tools. Google Chrome is a free Web browser that you download to your computer and use to access Web sites, including your Google Sites. Google Sites & Chrome For Dummies aims to fill the void between what Google thinks is obvious and intuitive and what real people like you need to know to make the most of these two cool tools, including some not-so-obvious tweaks and features. By the time you finish reading this book, we hope that you not only can master these two spiffy Google products, but also that your eyes are opened to a few of the more than 30 free products and services and how they mesh. About This Book This book is designed for all audiences. Whether you’re a soccer mom, a col- lege professor, a movie exec, or a skater dude, we have something in here for you. This book helps you understand the tools you need to start building your new site and how to use them. Although we do our best to make sure what you read in this book is accurate and up-to-date, we can’t make any promises. You see, Google likes to update things from time to time. Their products are called perpetual betas, meaning that the new bells and whistles discovered by the folks at Google often sneak into these products and change a thing or two. We just thought you should know. 2 Google Sites & Chrome For Dummies How This Book Is Organized We divide this book into parts and chapters, organizing the chapters into six parts (which we describe in the following sections). Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome Part I is the obvious place to start if you’re brand new to Google Sites and Chrome. Chapter 1 provides a general overview of Google Sites; we keep it short because we realize that if you have the great wisdom to pick up this book in the first place, you’re probably anxious to get started. Chapter 2 gets you up and running with Chrome and highlights the browser’s basics. Chapter 3 runs through the process of setting up Google Sites for your busi- ness, school, or organization using a Google Account or the Google Apps Team Edition. Finally, Chapter 4 lets you get your hands dirty and shows you the tools you need to start building your site. Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Chapter 5 covers using the five basic templates to help organize information and files on your site. Chapter 6 goes into adding content from other Google Apps and the Web. When you’re feeling creative, look to Chapter 7 for tips on how to choose a new theme and adjust individual colors and graphics. Finally, Chapter 8 shows you how to add other users to the flurry. Part III: Getting the Most Out of Chrome The two chapters in this part help you become a Chrome master. Chapter 9 goes into depth on using the Omnibox to search the Web and find your way around Chrome’s tools. Chapter 10 gets technical, taking you through the settings and Chrome’s advanced features. 3 Introduction Part IV: Building Your Own Scheme We decided that there’s more to Sites than showing you the tools, so this part gives you three practical ideas, which we like to call schemes, for creating your site. Chapter 11 gives you ideas for a personal site. Chapter 12 throws out a college course scheme, and Chapter 13 helps you build a business wiki or intranet using Google Sites. Part V: More Google Apps You Can’t Do Without This part helps you expand your site by using the other Google Apps, including Google Docs, Google Calendar, Gmail, and Google Talk. Chapters 14 through 17 introduce you to the Google Docs Home and discuss how to create and orga- nize your online documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. Rounding out this part is Google Calendar in Chapter 18, Gmail in Chapter 19, and Google Talk and Contacts in Chapter 20. This part will have you proficient in Google’s communications tools in no time flat. Part VI: The Part of Tens This part begins by giving ten additional team scheme ideas in Chapter 21. Ending the book is Chapter 22, which suggests more Google Apps and services that you may want to explore. (This final chapter is one of our favorites.) Conventions Used in This Book To make using this book as easy and convenient as possible, we set up a few conventions: ✓ When we throw a new term at you, we place it in italics and define it. ✓ We place text that you actually type in bold. 4 Google Sites & Chrome For Dummies ✓ Web site addresses and file names appear in a monospace font, like this: www.dummies.com. When part of a file name or Web site address varies (depending on what your Web site address is), we use italics to indicate a placeholder. For example, when you see http://sites.your domain.com, you type the address of your domain name in place of yourdomain.com. ✓ When you need to use a menu to select a command, we use the com- mand arrow (➪). For example, File➪Rename simply means that you should click the File menu and then choose the Rename command. ✓ When we show keyboard shortcuts, we place the plus sign (+) between keys. For example, to use the Cut command, press Ctrl+X. This means to press the Ctrl key and the X key at the same time. Icons Used In This Book From time to time, everyone gets distracted, starts to daydream, gets a little hungry, and quits paying attention. In a seemingly futile attempt to regain your attention from that long-overdue Snickers bar, we place icons through- out the book. Each has its own deep-sleep preventive powers: We mark paragraphs that we think you’ll find very useful with this icon. Tips show you shortcuts, timesavers, or something that’s otherwise worth noting. So, wake up and pay attention! When you see this icon, beware. From experience, we know when you can easily make a mistake that may cause irreparable harm or damage to the Internet or national security. Well, maybe the Warning icon doesn’t point out something that dire, but you should still pay attention or risk losing data, time, and possibly hair (from pulling it out in frustration). Rather than repeat ourselves (because maybe you didn’t pay attention the first time), we pop this icon in place. Commit the information to memory, and it can help you later. Okay, we don’t use this icon unless we have to. When you see this icon, we’re flagging some information that’s more technical and nerdy than the rest of the text. You might find the information really cool and very interesting, despite being technical, so read it at your discretion. 5 Introduction Where to Go from Here We’re not going to hold you back any longer. Any of the first four chapters is a great way to dive right in. Start finding out about Google Sites in Chapter 1, install Google Chrome in Chapter 2, sign up for a Google Account in Chapter 3, and begin building your new site in Chapter 4. 6 Google Sites & Chrome For Dummies Part I Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome In this part . . . Google Sites changes how you share information on the Web and Google Chrome helps you do it at light- ning speed. We know you’re anxious to dig in, so here’s where you can find how to get up and running with Google Sites and Chrome. Find out all about Google Sites, down- load and install Chrome, sign up for Google Apps, and start building. If you’ve previously signed up for a Google Apps or Gmail account and have already installed Chrome, skip ahead to Chapter 4 to start getting your feet wet. Chapter 1 Befriending Google Sites In This Chapter ▶ Introducing Google Sites ▶ Comparing Google Sites to other team apps ▶ Improving your life with Google Sites ▶ Deconstructing Google Sites Google Sites (http://sites.google.com) is a great online informa- tion buddy. After all, buddies watch out for their friends — and Sites will help take care of you. With a little thought and a few clicks, Google Sites can help you, your friends, and your co-workers stay on top of projects, meet- ings, classes, events, clubs, teams, causes, fundraisers, schedules, vacations, or anything else you can think of. Google Sites fills three related functions: ✓ Creates dynamic Web pages with a few clicks ✓ Constructs wikis for your users on any topic you may need ✓ Generates dynamic file sharing tools on the fly In this chapter (and this book), we show how Google Sites can be very help- ful to you, what that word wiki means, and how Google’s many online apps and gadgets can make your life much simpler. You see how Sites compares to all the other team collaboration tools out there so you can understand why picking Google Sites is as easy as making a mouse click. Now for the best part: Google Sites is a free component of Google Apps, along with Gmail, Calendar, and Docs. As with these other services, you don’t need programming skills, and you don’t need any complicated Web design soft- ware beyond a Web browser, such as Chrome, Internet Explorer, or Firefox. What You Should Know Before You Start Before you can use Google Sites, you must first have a Google Account or Google Apps account. A Google Account gives you access to a whole bunch of other free Google online services, such as Google Calendar (http:// 10 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome calendar.google.com), where you can track your appointments and events, Blogger (www.blogger.com), which lets you create your own blog, Picasa Web Albums (www.picasa.com), where you can share your photos online, and Google Docs (http://docs.google.com). If you don’t have an account, Chapter 3 shows you how to sign up. Like many other services offered by Google, Sites is a perpetual beta. This means that the clever Google engineers are always improving the way Sites works by adding new features and changing ones that aren’t as helpful. If the screen looks somewhat different from the figures that you see in this book, it’s okay. The same basic idea should still apply. To help you understand all that Google Sites has to offer, let us introduce you to three key definitions: Web pages, wikis, and file sharing. Web pages A Web page is a file that can be viewed by others in a Web browser. A page can include written text, images, links to other pages, videos, and so on. One way you can use Google Sites is to create a Web page with information you want to share with the world. An example of this type of site is shown in Figure 1-1. Figure 1-1: Use Google Sites to create a Web page. 11 Chapter 1: Befriending Google Sites In addition to helping you include your text and images, Google Sites gives you access to hundreds of gadgets that you can add to your page. Gadgets are like mini Web pages that show specific information, such as weather, news headlines, calendar events, videos, communication tools, and more. We talk about gadgets in depth in Chapter 6. Wikis A wiki is a Web page that anyone can add to or edit. Wiki is a Hawaiian word that means quick, and wiki sites are unique because they can be created, edited, and saved very quickly from within your Web browser. They’re also very helpful because every member of your group or team needs to go to only one place to find the latest information. Wikis are becoming more and more popular as companies, organizations, teams, and families work to share information and learn the unique things that people know. In any workplace, employees generally have more collec- tive knowledge about how a company operates than the human resources director or company president. By using a wiki, all employees can share their knowledge with everyone else. The human resources team can then edit and organize it all. How does a wiki work in Google Sites? Everyone who has the ability to edit a site will see the Create New Page and Edit Page buttons at the top of the page. When anyone in your group clicks the Edit Page button, they can begin making changes to the page by adding a graphic or paragraph. When they are done, all they have to do is click the Save button at the top and the page updates instantly. If you already have a site and you want to start editing your wiki, head over to Chapter 4. We’ve also put together a few ideas for creating a wiki for your work, family, class, or group in Part IV. File sharing A very important feature that goes hand in hand with wikis is the ability to keep your team’s files in a central location. File sharing lets members of your team upload any type of file, such as a presentation or video, so everyone else can find it later. When you upload a file, you send it from your computer to a Web site. Then other people can download the file by saving it from the Web site to their computer. 12 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Google Sites makes it easy to share files using the File Sharing page template, as shown in Figure 1-2. Similar to a editing a wiki page, you add and delete files by clicking the buttons that appear on a File Cabinet page. Additionally, Google Sites keeps track of multiple versions of your files, so if someone makes a change to a file and uploads the new one, you see both the new ver- sion and the old one. To find more about how to use the File Cabinet in Google Sites, check out Chapter 5. Figure 1-2: File sharing puts all of your important documents in one place. Define: Wikipedia The new Internet (also known as Web 2.0) is all about sharing information. Instead of simply connecting computers and services, the new Internet connects people and ideas. Look at the most famous wiki: Wikipedia (www. wikipedia.org). When this book was published, there were 2,472,151 articles in English, contributed by more than 7.5 mil- lion different users, covering everything from important historical events to pop culture, cal- culus proofs, and book summaries. Compare that to the meager 120,000 articles found in the Encyclopedia Britannica, which is one of the most comprehensive traditional sources. There’s no doubt that connecting people with wikis gives everyone access to more informa- tion and helps people feel that they are making a contribution to the world’s knowledge. 13 Chapter 1: Befriending Google Sites Comparing Google Sites to Other Team Sites We’re assuming that because you’re reading this book, you’re leaning toward using Google Sites. In case you’re curious, however, here’s how the others compare. Microsoft Office Live Workspace Microsoft Office Live Workspace (http://workspace.officelive.com) — a free service that’s probably the most similar to Sites — offers users the ability to share files easily and to comment on projects, as shown in Figure 1-3. Unlike Sites, however, there’s no Web page tool, so creating a wiki site isn’t part of the package. The main advantage to using Office Live Workspace is that if you use Microsoft Office, you can download a plug-in that gives you easy access to save your Office documents directly to the site. Office Live’s big brothers, Groove and SharePoint, offer additional features for larger companies but also require expensive servers and software. To use Office Live Workspace, you need a Windows Live ID and password, which you can get free at http://home.live.com. Figure 1-3: Microsoft Office Live Workspace makes it easy to share files. 14 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Blackboard and Moodle Blackboard (www.blackboard.com) and Moodle (www.moodle.org) are both great tools for teachers to keep track of classes, handouts, quizzes, and grades. (Moodle is shown in Figure 1-4.) They provide tools for pretty much any aspect of your class needs. But they’re also very complex and require extensive training every time a new semester rolls around. Figure 1-4: Moodle has more classroom features, such as quizzes and gradebooks. Blackboard and Moodle both require servers to run on, and someone to main- tain them. You also have to pay a license fee for Blackboard. If your school already uses either one, they have gone ahead and taken care of the cost. In cases where you don’t need all the bells and whistles or if you use other publisher-provided tools, Google Sites gives you the basics to share all of your classroom information with the students in your class. For an example of using Google Sites for a classroom, see Chapter 12. Acrobat Adobe takes a slightly different approach to sharing files. They offer five ser- vices through their Web site, www.acrobat.com, which allow you to create and share individual files with others: 15 Chapter 1: Befriending Google Sites ✓ Buzzword is an online word processor similar to Google Docs (see Chapter 15). ✓ ConnectNow lets you host online conferences and share your screen over the Internet. ✓ Create PDF is a tool to transform your documents into portable document format. ✓ Share lets you upload and invite others to see your documents. ✓ My Files gives you a place to keep your files and access them from anywhere. Instead of using a wiki-like interface, Acrobat gives you the option to enter the e-mail addresses of your team members so they can keep track of your files. Although this is useful for individual documents, it makes running a whole team project a little difficult because every time you want to share a file, you have to remember the addresses of everyone on your team. Still, the black interface is very easy to use and is just plain cool. Why Google Sites Is the Right Way to Do Things We mention in the previous section that Google Sites incorporates the best aspects of Web page, wiki, and file sharing technology into an easy-to-use online tool. But choosing Google Sites is about more than playing with a shiny new service — it’s also about saving you time and money. In this section, we share with you our two cents, just in case you’re not already convinced that Sites is the way to go. Simplifying your life The first thing you notice with Google Sites is Google’s trademark simplicity. Although other services may have more bells and whistles, Google Sites keeps it simple and gives you the features you need to get your work done without making you master a whole new complicated set of tools and features. With Google Sites, you can focus more on coordinating group activities to accomplish your tasks and less on figuring out all the extra stuff. Plus, you get all the training you need from this book. Now that’s simple! 16 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Saving money Google Sites is free. Talk about saving money. You don’t have to invest in expensive servers and software. All you need is an Internet connection and a Web browser, either of which you could get free at your public library, if you wanted. All of your pages, wikis, and files are hosted for free, along with your other Google services. The exception, of course, is if you use Google Apps Premier Edition (www.google.com/apps), but in that case, your organization is really paying for the support. (Google Apps Premier Edition, along with all other editions of Google Apps, is discussed in the next section.) Google can provide these services free because of the money they make on Internet search advertising. Next time you use Google Search, look for the sponsored links to the right of your results. That’s what pays the engineers to create these high-quality tools. How Google Sites Fits with the Other Google Apps Google Apps (www.google.com/apps) is made up of five fully-functioning online applications: Gmail, Calendar, Docs, Talk, and Sites. Communicating with other people on the Internet is a snap with Gmail and Talk, and collabo- ration is simple with Calendar, Docs, and Sites. Each of these apps are fully functioning programs that allow you to do your work, such as e-mail and word processing, from any Web browser, instead of relying on your comput- er’s other installed software. Additionally, you can quickly access informa- tion you store online by using mini versions of the apps called gadgets. There are different editions of the whole Google Apps package, depending on your organization and needs. These include: ✓ Team Edition: If you already have a school or work e-mail address, this edition adds Calendar, Docs, Talk, and Sites to the mix. Plus, you can instantly start connecting with other users in your organization that have already signed up. (Click the link for Coworkers or Classmates.) ✓ Standard Edition: If your group or business is just starting out or is switching from another service, such as Outlook, this free edition of Google Apps lets you use all five services with your existing domain name with minimal e-mail advertisements. (Click the Business IT Managers link, click the See Details and Sign Up button, and then click Compare to Standard Edition) 17 Chapter 1: Befriending Google Sites ✓ Premier Edition: This edition costs $50 per user per year, but adds more functionality and security than Standard Edition, more storage space, provides 24/7 support, and gets rid of the ads. (Click the Business IT Managers link.) ✓ Education Edition. This is just like Premier Edition, but free for univer- sities, schools, and other nonprofit organizations. (Click the School IT Managers link.) These apps just so happen to play nice with each other, too, by allowing you to easily share information from one app with another. Some of the fea- tures we talk about in this book include alerts, which are sent to your e-mail account, and embedded calendars, which help your team members know what’s coming up. In the next few sections, we give you a taste of what each of the other apps does and provide examples of how you can include them in your sites by using gadgets. You can find more about how to use these apps individually in Part V. Calendar Google Calendar (http://calendar.google.com) keeps track of your events. You can easily add new calendar items and access them from any- where, including your BlackBerry or iPhone. In Calendar, you can create separate calendars for your personal and team-related events and share them with other members of your team. Displaying your team calendar is easy in Google Sites, thanks to the Calendar gadget. From your site, everyone can quickly find upcoming events or follow up on meetings that happened. Figure 1-5 shows an agenda for a class, using the Calendar gadget. Skip to Chapter 14 to begin coordinating schedules. Docs Create, edit, and store documents, spreadsheets, and presentations online with Google Docs (http://docs.google.com). Google Docs features a surprisingly powerful word processor, spreadsheet editor, and presentations app that provide most of the tools you need. One of the cool things about Docs is that you can share your documents with other team members and work on them at the same time. This way, any changes you make are auto- matically updated and everyone else can see them right away. 18 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Figure 1-5: Place your team calendar on your site. It should be no surprise, then, that you can include your docs on Google Sites, too. Beyond simply creating links to your individual docs, Google Sites uses gadgets to place the content of your docs directly on your pages, as shown in Figure 1-6. For example, use the Spreadsheet gadget to include a list you have stored in a spreadsheet or the Presentation gadget to play an ani- mated slideshow of a quarterly report. To find out more about Google Docs, flip to Chapter 15 and begin exploring the Google Docs Home. Chapters 16, 17, and 18 cover the basics for word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations, respectively. Gmail Gmail (www.gmail.com) is Google’s solution to e-mail. It features a simple interface and a lot of cool innovations, such as conversations and labels. You can also use Gmail with your favorite e-mail program, such as Outlook or Thunderbird. Unlike other free e-mail services, which feature annoying graphical ads, Gmail uses text ads that are less bothersome. 19 Chapter 1: Befriending Google Sites Figure 1-6: View the contents of a document without having to open it. With Google Apps, Gmail works with your group’s domain name. This means that your e-mail can still be you@yourcompany.com, but you can use Gmail’s intuitive interface and have your e-mail hosted by Google. Google Sites uses e-mail notifications to let your group or team members know when something changes on your site. When a change is made to a page, Google Sites sends subscribers an e-mail showing exactly what changes were made and gives you a link to open that page directly. See Chapter 19 to find out more about Gmail. Talk When e-mail simply isn’t fast enough, use Google Talk (http://talk. google.com). Talk is a really cool instant messaging app that you can either download to your computer or run directly from your site. If you’re using Google Apps Team Edition, your co-workers or fellow students are automati- cally added to your contact list, similar to Figure 1-7. When one of your con- tacts is online (they’ll have a green dot next to their name), simply click their name and start telling them why they’re the best member of your team. When you chat with more that one person, each conversation shows as a tab along the top of the Talk gadget. 20 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Figure 1-7: See whether your team members are online and chat with them directly. Add the Talk gadget to any page on your site, and you and your team mem- bers are signed in automatically each time you visit. The second half of Chapter 19 gets you talking with your team and friends. Go there when you want to start talking. Chapter 2 Getting to Know Chrome In This Chapter ▶ Downloading and installing Google Chrome ▶ Running Chrome for the first time ▶ Finding your way around Chrome ▶ Using tabs and the Omnibox We’re going out on a limb here, but if you’re reading this book, we’re guessing you’re more than just a little familiar with the Internet. In your Internet experience, you’ve no doubt noticed a whole host of new Web services, including wikis, online apps, and social networking, which are changing how we interact with people and information. This new thinking and set of new tools and services is called Web 2.0, and it’s light years ahead of the first Web pages of simple text and links. Google thinks it’s time for your browser to evolve, too. The browser is your window to all the information that is created and shared by Web 2.0 services, including Google Sites. Although other browsers have become bulky and slow, Google Chrome provides a fresh, clean view of your favorite sites and services and delivers them fast and efficiently, due to its optimized design. In this chapter, you get to know Chrome a little better. You find out how to download and install the new Chrome browser. We also show you where all the important buttons and tools are. Part III of this book digs deeper into the settings and features of this lightning-fast browser, so when you’re comfort- able, skip ahead to check it out. Choosing Google Chrome You have many browser choices out there. If you’re running Windows, you have likely used Internet Explorer to see the world. If you have a Mac, your Web is powered by Safari. Although both of these browsers do a fine job of displaying your pages and running your apps, there’s a better way. Chrome, 22 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome shown in Figure 2-1, was built from the ground up as a browser for Web 2.0. The developers focused specifically on speed, security, and reliability throughout the design process. Plus, Chrome taps into Google Search to make finding information a breeze. You see what we mean in this section. Figure 2-1: Google Chrome’s impressive interface. Using a faster browser Internet apps use technology that is much more advanced than simple HTML. Older browsers started simple and kept adding new capabilities. Over time, they’ve become bulky and slow because each app has to load before the browser can load. Who has time to wait for browser windows to open? Chrome takes advantage of new technology that runs many of these advanced features without using as much computer memory as other older browsers. This means that Chrome starts immediately after you open it and new tabs appear just as quickly. Additionally, many online apps, including Gmail and Google Sites, run much faster in Chrome than in other browsers. Try it and you’ll see what we mean. If you decide Chrome isn’t for you, our feelings won’t be hurt. You can always go back to Internet Explorer, Safari, or whatever other browser you’re used to. However, it’s going to take a lot of effort to pry us away from Chrome. 23 Chapter 2: Getting to Know Chrome Making the most of Google Search The Internet is built around search. Whether you’re reviewing products, mastering a new medical procedure, or looking for that special e-mail message, search is indispensable. That’s why Chrome builds in Google Search technology everywhere from finding Web sites to locating bookmarks to checking your browsing history. One of the unique features of Chrome is the Omnibox, as shown in Figure 2-2. The Omnibox combines the browser’s address bar, search bar, and search from other Web sites into one location. Whether you know the address or want Google to find it, the Omnibox takes care of you. You find out more about the Omnibox later in this chapter. Believe it or not, several other search services are out there that you can use in place of Google, including Yahoo!, Live Search, AOL, and more. When you open Chrome the first time, you have the option to choose Google Search or some other service. You can change it at any time using the Options screen, which we cover in Chapter 10. Browser Wars I & II In the beginning (around AD 1994) there was Mosaic, a small, primitive HTML browser that first popularized the Web. Mosaic was created at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by a bunch of hotshot programmers, many of whom moved to Silicon Valley and created the next big breakthrough, a much faster browser forever remembered as simply Netscape. Netscape Navigator was the browser of choice until the late ’90s when Microsoft released Internet Explorer (IE was first licensed from much of the lingering Mosaic code) and the first browser war ensued. With a good initial product and its fabled mar- keting might, Microsoft captured more and more users and pulled ahead as the mainstream Internet browser. Netscape slowly faded into history. While IE began to dominate, however, it added everything and the kitchen sink. The browser bogged down and broke down more than many users could tolerate. As time went on, the Web was supercharged with 2.0 apps. More and more ’Net apps, such as messaging, voice apps, streaming video, chat, social networking, and online word pro- cessing became popular. With Web 2.0, having a fast, reliable Web browser has become more important than ever. In a response to changing needs, a number of alternative browsers have come out to challenge IE. A second browser war is now in full force. This time, Internet Explorer faces stiff competition from Apple Safari, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, and Google Chrome. The focus of these browsers is a return to an efficient, secure, and fast browser that can get the most out of Web 2.0 apps. Regardless of who wins the next browser skirmish, users are the ultimate winners with a better way to view and use the Web. 24 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Figure 2-2: The Omnibox is your one-stop search spot. Keeping your computer safe Chrome even protects you from people who would steal your information or install bad software onto your computer. Every time you use it, Chrome automatically downloads a list of Web sites that Google knows are bad. They either try to get you to give up your personal information or load soft- ware to track your behavior. Whenever you come across a bad site, Google blocks the screen and helps you navigate away. If you’re certain the site is legitimate, there’s an option to continue at your own risk. Scammers like to make you think you’re visiting a popular site, such as your bank or eBay. Although Chrome does its best to protect you from these sites, do not enter personal information, such as PINs or Social Security numbers, on a site that you visit from an e-mail link. When in doubt, visit the site directly (by typing www.ebay.com, for example) and log in, or call the organization to see whether the request is valid. With the Omnibox, you have a handful of ways to tell whether a site is legiti- mate. In the Omnibox, the domain name of the site you’re visiting appears in black letters and the rest of the long address is gray. If you’re visiting an eBay page, make sure that the address shows www.ebay.com and not some other address. When you’re on a secure site, the Omnibox is yellow and a lock icon appears on the right side. You’ll also notice that the “https” letters appear in green. Downloading and Installing Chrome Now that you’ve read a few reasons why we feel Chrome is better than other browsers, it’s time to dig in and start using it. This section helps you get up and running in no time flat. Getting Chrome onto your computer takes just a few clicks. If you’re click happy, follow Steps 1 and 2 below and click the buttons that make sense. Chrome installs in a matter of seconds. Otherwise, here are detailed steps to help you set up Chrome just how you want. 25 Chapter 2: Getting to Know Chrome 1. Open your browser and navigate to www.google.com/chrome. 2. Click the blue Download Google Chrome button on the right side of the screen. The Google Chrome Terms of Service screen appears, showing a bunch of legalese text. Optionally, you can grab your lawyer and try to make sense of it. 3. (Optional) If you want to help Google create better features, click the Optional check box. If you choose this check box, Chrome lets Google know which search suggestions you’ve chosen and which Web pages cause your browser to crash. 4. Click the Accept and Install button. 5. In the download window that appears, click Run or Open. If another window appears, click Run one more time. The Google Chrome Installer quickly downloads and installs the Chrome browser automatically. When the installation is complete, Chrome opens and the Welcome to Google Chrome window appears. 6. (Optional) Click the Customize These Settings link and adjust your Google Chrome setup. In the Customize Your Settings window that appears, check the boxes for the settings you want to adjust. • Import settings from: Check this box and choose your browser from the drop-down list to import your bookmarks, saved passwords, and other settings into Chrome. • Make Google Chrome the default browser: Check this box to set Chrome as your primary browser. This means that every time you open a Web page, Chrome will open instead of Internet Explorer or Firefox. • Desktop: Check this option to create a shortcut icon to Chrome on your desktop. • Quick Launch bar: Check this box to add a shortcut to your Quick Launch bar (to the right of your Start menu). 7. Click the Start Google Chrome button. The Chrome browser appears, as shown in Figure 2-3. Start browsing right away, or check out the next section of this chapter to find out more about Chrome basics. 26 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Figure 2-3: The Chrome window appears automati- cally. 8. (Optional) Choose your default search engine. The first time Chrome launches, you’re asked to choose a search engine. Click the Keep Google button if you plan to use Google for your searches, otherwise click the Change Search Engine button. In the Options screen that appears, choose your preferred search engine from the drop-down list to the right of Default Search. Finding Your Way around Chrome Remember we said Chrome was fast? You’ll notice how fast the window and new tabs appear. The Google engineers were thinking of speed when they built Chrome. Chrome’s interface is designed to be minimal (refer to Figure 2-1). There’s no menu bar, no random toolbars, and even the bookmarks only appear on the first page by default. Remember that when you use Chrome, your focus should be the Internet, not the browser. In this section, we help you make the most of tabs, the New Tab page, and the Omnibox. When you’re ready to dig deeper, see Chapters 9 and 10. 27 Chapter 2: Getting to Know Chrome Discovering tabs In Chrome, tabs appear along the top of the window, like folders in a file drawer. Add a new tab by clicking the + (plus sign) button to the right of the set of tabs. Close a tab by clicking the small X on the right edge of that tab. If only one tab is open and you click the X, Chrome will close completely. Each tab has its own toolbar, complete with navigation buttons and Omnibox, as shown in Figure 2-4. Here’s what each button does, from left to right: Figure 2-4: Use tabs to keep your pages under control. Reload Bookmark Forward Omnibox Go Page menu Tools menu Back ✓ Back (left arrow): Return to the last page you visited. ✓ Forward (right arrow): Go forward after you’ve gone to a previous page. ✓ Reload (circular arrow): Refresh the current page. This is helpful when you’re following a breaking news story or the page doesn’t display correctly. ✓ Bookmark (star): Add the current page to your list of bookmarks. Even though a bookmark is added automatically, a popup window appears where you can rename or organize your bookmarks. Chapter 9 has more info on bookmarks. ✓ Omnibox: Enter your URL or search term here, and then click the Go button. ✓ Go (right-facing triangle): Load the address or search term found in the Omnibox. ✓ Page menu: Access common features, such as Copy/Paste or Print. ✓ Tools menu: Adjust settings or view your browsing history and down- loads. Keeping tabs (no pun intended) on your Internet experience can be a little daunting. While you browse the Internet, chances are you end up with a pile of browser windows that clutter your computer desktop. All the open 28 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome windows slow down your computer and make it difficult to switch to other programs you may be using. Tabs help alleviate that pain by grouping all of your browser windows into one pane. If you’re used to opening a new browser window each time, start thinking tabs, not windows. For those of you who have the Ctrl+N keyboard shortcut down pat, we’d like to suggest an alternative: Ctrl+T, which creates a new tab. As a bonus, use Ctrl+Tab to cycle through your tabs and Alt+Tab (or Cmd+Tab for you Mac users out there) to flip through your windows. New Tab page Where do you go when you open your browser? If you’re like most people, you either head to a particular site that you have in mind or want to search the Web for some information. If you’re like us, you probably have a handful of Web sites you visit every day. Well, forget using a traditional Home page; the New Tab page can become your new best friend for finding your way easily on the Web. Every time you start Chrome or open a new tab, the New Tab page loads, revealing all sorts of goodies to enhance your browsing experience. The New Tab page gives you quick access to pages that you’re likely to visit. Of course, you can always just start typing in the Omnibox. Here’s a highlight of each feature of the New Tab page, which you can also see in Figure 2-5. Figure 2-5: Use tabs to keep your pages under control. Bookmarks bar Recent bookmarksSearches Most visited Recently closed tabs 29 Chapter 2: Getting to Know Chrome ✓ Bookmarks bar: Bookmarks to your favorite pages appear in the blue bar, just below the toolbar. When your bookmarks don’t all fit, you can find them by clicking the Other Bookmarks button on the right side of the bar. ✓ Most Visited: Whether it’s a blog, your social network, or e-mail, the pages you visit most appear here with little screenshots, so you have a pretty good idea of where you’re headed. This section automatically changes as your taste does, based on the number of times you’ve visited that page. Click the Show Full History link at the bottom of the screen to see where you’ve been. ✓ Searches: Quickly find a site in your history or other sites by using the Searches box. Searches will even find text on the page if you don’t remember the site name. ✓ Recent Bookmarks: For bookmark junkies (you know who you are), look here for the latest additions to your treasure trove. Those bookmarks will likely appear on your Bookmarks bar, too. ✓ Recently Closed Tabs: Accidentally close a tab that you didn’t want to? When you open a new tab in the same window, your closed tabs appear. Click the title and it will reappear, complete with that tab’s browsing history, so you can go backward and forward right where you left off. If you really want to see your traditional Home page instead of the New Tab page when you start Chrome, click the Tools menu and choose Options. In the Google Chrome Options screen that appears, look for the Home Page section and select the radio button next to Open This Page. Type your normal Home page address in the box to the right and then click the Close button. Note: The New Tab page still loads on all new tabs. Unleashing the Omnibox What could be better than a feature called the Omnibox? The Omnibox sits there quietly, waiting to spring into action and take you where you want to go on the Internet. Here are a few reasons why we think the Chrome Omnibox rocks and how you can use it to become a browsing master. ✓ You can use it to load a site. The Omnibox is an address bar. Type the URL of the site you want to visit, such as http://sites.google.com, and you’re taken there instantly. When you start typing in the Omnibox, not only does the URL or search term appear, but you also see suggestions for searches, popular pages, recent pages you’ve visited, bookmarks, and more. Look back at Figure 2-2 to see the Omnibox in action. 30 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome ✓ You can use it to activate a search on other sites. You can also use the Omnibox to search other sites, such as Amazon.com or Wikipedia. First, you have to activate the site, and then you can search the site using Omnibox. Here’s how: 1. To activate search on a site, first visit the main page and perform a simple search. For example, go to www.amazon.com and search for Google Apps For Dummies. From now on, you can search the whole Amazon.com site using Omnibox. A search box for your site will also appear in the Searches section of the New Tab page. 2. Enter the site you want to search into the Omnibox. Type the address of the site you want to search, such as Amazon. com. If your site is activated, you see the Press Tab to Search Amazon.com on the right side of the Omnibox, as shown in Figure 2-6. 3. Press Tab on your keyboard and then enter your search term in the Omnibox. The site address changes to a blue Search yoursite.com bar. 4. Click the Go button to the right of the Omnibox or press Enter on your keyboard. The results for your search appear directly in the browser window. Figure 2-6: Use the Omnibox to search other sites. When you have the Omnibox down pat, you’re ready to enjoy the Internet fully. There’s a lot more you can do with Google Chrome. Be sure to check out Chapters 9 and 10 for more info. Chapter 3 Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online In This Chapter: ▶ Getting a Google account ▶ Choosing the right version of Google Apps ▶ Using the dashboard ▶ Inviting others to join Google Apps ▶ Customizing Apps to fit your taste Google Sites isn’t going to sit there and do everything for you, although we sometimes wish it did. No, you have to get out there and sign up for an account with Google. A Google Account gives you access to Google Sites, as well as to other services such as Google Health (www.google.com/ health) where you can track your medical history online, and iGoogle (www. google.com/ig) which keeps your e-mail, news, and so on, all on one page. Don’t worry, though; it isn’t difficult at all to sign up for an account, unless, like us, you have a hard time reading garbled letters — you see what we mean in a few pages. You can choose from two types of accounts: a Google account and a Google Apps account. We know they sound awfully similar, but there really is a differ- ence in what each one does, and we want to make sure that you choose the best one for you. Here’s a quick look at the two: ✓ Google Account: This type of account is what the typical home user would choose, especially if that user isn’t associated with a company, organization, or school. You can use your regular, tried-and-true e-mail address as your Google Account login, although we personally like Gmail and recommend you sign up for it, too. A Google account also lets you create personalized maps and YouTube channels, upload photos, and access other really cool tools and services. 32 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome ✓ Google Apps account: If you work for a company or are part of a school, and you use e-mail provided by your organization, a Google Apps account is the way to go. Your Google Apps account connects you automatically with other people in your organization, assuming they share the same domain name (that’s the part of your e-mail address after the @ sign). This connection makes it really easy to share Sites, Calendars, and Docs. You can also chat right away with your colleagues because you share the same contacts list. Creating a Google Account You’re just moments away from using Google Sites and all the other great services and tools offered by Google. Before you sign up for a new Google account, check to make sure that you don’t have an account already. Open your Web browser and navigate to http://sites.google.com. If you don’t have an account or haven’t signed in, your screen should look similar to Figure 3-1. On the other hand, if you see a list of sites or the option to choose your e-mail address, you likely already have an account. Google will double-check your address when you sign up. Figure 3-1: Check to see whether you have a Google Account. There are two ways to sign up for a regular Google account, depending on what else you want to do with it. To use your existing e-mail address, read the first section below. If you don’t have an e-mail account (we know there are some of you out there) or if you want to make the switch to Gmail, follow the instructions under “Signing up for a Google account using Gmail” later in this section. When you sign up for Gmail, a Google Account is automatically created using your new Gmail address. After you’ve signed up for a Google account, be sure to check out all the other cool stuff Google offers at www.google.com/options. To get a sneak peek at some of our favorites, check out Chapter 21. 33 Chapter 3: Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online After you create a Google account, you have to sign in only once to access all the other Google services. You just have to remember your e-mail address and password the first time you log in after you open your Web browser. Signing up for a Google account using your existing e-mail address Creating an account with your existing e-mail address is simple. Just follow these steps: 1. Open your browser and navigate to http://sites.google.com (you can also go to www.google.com/accounts to create a new account). Your screen should look similar to Figure 3-1. 2. Click the Get Started link on the right side of the page below the login box. In the textbox that appears, enter your e-mail address and click the Go button that appears on the right. After Google has made sure that your account doesn’t already exist, click the Sign Up for a Google Account link that appears below the textbox. You should see a screen that looks like Figure 3-2. Figure 3-2: Create a Google account using your e-mail address. 3. In the textboxes on the Create an Account screen, enter your e-mail address and create a password with at least eight characters. From the Location list, choose your country, and then enter the scrambled letters in the Word Verification box. 34 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome If you can’t read the letters, try reloading the page to get a new image, or click the wheelchair icon to the right of the box to hear the letters spoken. Deciphering these letters is probably the hardest part of signing up. The Password Strength bar on the right tells you whether your pass- word is strong enough. A strong password usually has a mix of letters, numbers, and special characters, such as # or ^. For tips on how to choose a secure password, click the Password Strength link. 4. Read the Terms of Service. If they look good to you and you’re ready to create your account, click the I Accept. Create My Account button at the bottom of the page. An e-mail is sent to your e-mail account to verify that you actually own it. 5. Log into your e-mail and look for a new message from Google titled “Google Email Verification.”. Click the long cryptic-looking link in that e-mail to verify your account. The screen that appears thanks you for verifying your account. Note: Depending on your e-mail service, you may need to click a button at the top of the message to enable the link. You can also copy and paste the address in a new browser window if that doesn’t work. Congratulations! You now have an official Google account! When you’re ready to begin creating a new site, return to http://sites.google.com in your browser and skip ahead to Chapter 4 for some helpful pointers. Signing up for a Google account using Gmail So you need an e-mail address, huh? Or are you tired of your old one and want to switch to a shiny new one? Either way, we think that Gmail is the way to go and in this section we help you get your very own address . As an added bonus, your Gmail address will act as your login for your new Google account. Here are five easy steps to create your Gmail/Google account: 1. Open your Web browser and navigate to www.gmail.com. Your screen should look like Figure 3-3. 2. Click the Sign Up For Gmail link on the right side of the screen, below the Sign In box. To find out more about Gmail’s features, click the About Gmail and New Features! link in the bottom-right corner of the screen (shown in Figure 3-3) before you sign up. You can also find out how to become a Gmail master by reading Chapter 19 of this book. 35 Chapter 3: Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online Figure 3-3: Sign up for a Gmail account. 3. In the textboxes that appear on the Create Account screen, enter your personal information. Aside from the basic boxes, such as your name, here are some helpful tips for successfully creating a Gmail account. • In the box to the right of Desired Login Name, enter the username you would like and click the Check Availability button. If your name isn’t available, red words appear that suggest some available names similar to the username you chose. Choose one of the suggestions by clicking the radio button to the left of it, or enter a new user- name and click the Check Availability button again. Repeat these steps until you find an available name (the warning text changes from red to blue when your username is available). • When you choose a password, the Password Strength bar on the right tells you whether your password is strong. A strong password usually has a mix of letters, numbers, and special characters, such as # or ^. For tips on how to choose a secure password, click the Password Strength link. • Be sure to choose a security question that you’ll remember. If you ever forget your password, you’ll need to answer the question correctly to access your account. You can also enter a secondary e-mail address, if you have one, and Google will send a link to reset your password there. • From the Location list, choose your country, and then enter the scram- bled letters in the Word Verification box below. If you can’t read the letters, try reloading the page to get a new image, or click the wheelchair icon to the right of the box to hear the letters spoken. 36 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome 4. Read the Terms of Service. If you agree with them and are ready to create your account, click the I Accept. Create My Account button at the bottom of the page. You’re taken to a screen that introduces you to Gmail. 5. Click the I’m Ready – Show Me My Account link in the top-right corner of the Introduction screen to go to your new Gmail inbox. Now that you have an account, go to Chapter 4 to start building your Google Sites. If you want to find out more about Gmail, Chapter 19 is waiting for you now! Creating a Google Apps Account Start taking advantage of Google Sites for your team, your classroom, or your company by signing up for a Google Apps account with your school or work e-mail address. In Chapter 1, we mention four different editions of Google Apps: Standard, Premier, Education, and Team. Your organization may already have signed up for Google Apps Standard, Premier, or Education Edition, in which case your administrator should have given you a username and password. If you haven’t received a login or your company doesn’t use Google Apps, you can jump right into Google Apps Team Edition. Google has created a custom address for your Google Apps. The address will look similar to www.google.com/a/yourschool.edu or www.google. com/a/yourwork.com, replacing yourschool.edu or yourwork.com with your school or work domain name, of course. Follow these steps to sign up for Google Apps Team Edition: If you receive an e-mail invitation to Google Apps from a co-worker or fellow student or professor, click the link in the message and skip to Step 3. 1. Open your browser and navigate to your Google Apps custom address (www.google.com/a/your-domain.com). Your screen should look similar to Figure 3-4. 2. Click the Create an Account Here link on the left side of the screen, below the login box. The Google Apps Team Edition Sign Up screen loads. Note: If you don’t see the Create an Account Here link, chances are your organization already has a different edition of Google Apps. Check with your adminis- trator to obtain your login information. 37 Chapter 3: Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online Figure 3-4: Open your custom login screen to create a Google Apps account. 3. On the Sign Up screen, enter your current e-mail username and choose a password. Then enter the garbled letters in the Word Verification box and enter your name and location in the boxes that follow. When you choose a password, the Password Strength bar below the password box tells you whether your password is strong. A strong password usually has a mix of letters, numbers, and special characters, such as # or ^. For tips on how to choose a secure password, click the Password Strength link. Google recommends that you shouldn’t use your work password to protect your security. 4. Read the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy in the box at the bottom of the screen. When you’re ready to create your account, click the I Accept. Continue to Google Apps button below the box. An e-mail is sent to your regular work or school address. Note: You may have to wait a minute or two for the e-mail to arrive. 5. Log into your e-mail Inbox and open the message from Google titled “Google Apps: Sign-Up Verification”. Click the long, cryptic link to verify your address. On the Thank You screen that appears, click the Click Here to Continue link to return to your Google Apps login screen. That’s it! You now have a Google Apps account and can start working with your co-workers, study group, or fellow professors. Continue reading to begin exploring the Google Apps dashboard. 38 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Logging In and Finding Your Way around the Dashboard The Google Apps dashboard gives you access to all your Google Apps, includ- ing Sites, Docs, Calendar, Start Page (which is similar to iGoogle), and Talk (Chat), from one convenient Web page. It also connects you with the other users in your school or work domain, and lets you invite your co-workers and classmates to join. To log into the Google Apps dashboard, open your browser and navigate to your Google Apps custom address (www.google.com/a/your-domain. com). Your screen should look similar to Figure 3-4 in the preceding section. Enter your username (the part of your e-mail address before the @ sign) and password in the boxes on the left side of the screen and click the Sign In button. The dashboard appears, as shown in Figure 3-5. Bookmark your Google Apps custom address for quick access to your login and dashboard. In the sections that follow, we help you launch your Google Apps, invite others to join, customize the appearance of your organization’s Google Apps services, and last but not least, change your password. Figure 3-5: Access your Google Apps from the dash- board. Launching your Google Apps From the dashboard, you can launch any of your Google Apps, including Google Sites by clicking the name of the app from the list on the right, as 39 Chapter 3: Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online shown in Figure 3-5. You can also download Google Talk to your computer by clicking the Downloading Google Talk link and then clicking the Open or Save File button on the dialog box that appears. After you open an app, such as Calendar, click any of the links in the top-left corner of your screen to quickly switch between your other apps, such as Docs or Sites. Open your Google Apps custom address (you bookmarked it, right?) to return to your dashboard at any time. Inviting other users to join Google Apps Because Google Apps is optimized for teams, getting your co-workers and fellow students to join you online is important if you want to get the most from Sites and the other apps. Here’s how you invite other users: 1. Check to see whether your team members have already signed up for Google Apps by clicking the Users link in the box on the left side of the dashboard. A screen similar to Figure 3-6 appears. 2. From this screen, click the Invite New Users link to open a screen where you can send a message to other users in your domain. The Invite New Users screen appears. You can also click the Invite More Users link on the main dashboard screen to open this screen. 3. In the top box, enter the e-mail addresses of your co-workers or fellow students. Then enter a short message in the box below. If you have more than one address, separate the addresses with a comma. Also, your team’s e-mail addresses must have the same domain as you for them to receive the invitation. In Chapter 8, we show you how to invite users from outside of your domain to view your Google Sites. Figure 3-6: View a list of existing Google Apps users in your domain. 40 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome 4. Click the Invite Users button at the bottom of the screen to send your invitation and return to the User Accounts screen or the dashboard. When they open your invitation, they can click on the link and enter their account information in the screen that appears, as described in the previous section. If you decide you don’t want to send the invitation, click the Cancel button to discard your message and return to the dashboard. Customizing your apps appearance A lesser known, but really cool, feature of Google Apps is the ability to modify how your login screen looks and add your own custom logo to each of your apps. The custom logo replaces the official Google logo that appears in the top-left corner of each of the apps. With Google Apps Team Edition, anyone in your domain can customize the appearance. Generally, one person adds a logo, and when it’s set, everyone else leaves it alone. But, if you or another user gets tired of how things look, here’s how to add a little pizzazz to your Google Apps: 1. Open your browser and log into your Google Apps dashboard. The address for the login screen is similar to www.google.com/a/ yourdomain.com. 2. Click the Customize Appearance link in the box on the left side of the screen. A screen that looks similar to Figure 3-7 appears. Figure 3-7: Choose a custom logo for your domain. 41 Chapter 3: Signing Up for Google Apps and Getting Your Team Online 3. Choose a set of header logos that you want to use with your Google Apps. To use the default Google logos, click the radio button to the left of Default Logos. To use a custom logo, click the radio button to the left of Custom Logo and do the following: a. On your computer, locate a copy of your logo and save it to your Desktop folder. For best results, resize your logo (using Paint or a similar program) to 143 x 59 pixels and save it as either a PNG or GIF file. You can use a larger, unedited image, but it may appear distorted or fuzzy when it’s loaded within Google Apps. b. Return to your Web browser and click the Browse button. A File Browser window appears. c. In the File Browser window, navigate to your desktop and select the logo you downloaded. Click the Open button to return to the Customize screen. d. Click the Upload button to save your logo to Google Apps. A preview of your logo appears in the Custom Logo box. Be sure to click the radio button next to Custom Logo to make your new logo active. 4. Select a Sign-in Box Color from the options near the bottom of the Customize screen by clicking the radio button to the left of the color option you want. If you want to create a custom box color, click the radio button to the left of the Custom option and enter a hex number for the colors you want for the border and background. Even we don’t know what the hex number is except that it’s a 6-digit number that identifies one color out of millions. To find the perfect color (and its hex number), open another browser window and navigate to www.colorschemer.com/online.html. Click the colors on the palette at the bottom of the screen to find similar colors. When you find your color, copy the hex number below it (it’s the number with the # sign), return to the Customize screen, and paste the number in the Border or Background box. 5. When you’re happy with your new logo and sign-in box colors, click the Save Changes button at the bottom of the screen. When you return to the dashboard or load any of your apps, your new logo appears. It also appears for each of the other users in your domain. 42 Par t I: Get ting Star ted with Google Sites and Chrome Changing your password It’s a good idea to change your password from time to time. Aside from making you remember yet another new password, it’s a good way to keep your information safe. That is unless you keep forgetting your password, and then it doesn’t help very much at all. Here’s how to make sure that you have the best new password: 1. To change your Google Apps password, click the Change Your Password link in the box on the left side of the dashboard screen. 2. Enter your current password in the appropriate box, and then enter your new password in the two boxes that follow. Keep an eye on the Password Strength meter to make sure that your new password is strong. 3. Click the Change Password button to save your new password and return to the dashboard. If you ever forget your Google Apps password, you can easily create a new one from the login screen. Here’s how: 1. Click the I Cannot Access My Account link at the bottom of the sign-in box. 2. Enter your username on the next screen and click the Submit button. 3. On the next screen, type the garbled letters that appear in the box and click Submit. Google sends you an e-mail with a link to a page where you can reset your password. 4. Open your e-mail, look for the message titled “Google Password Assistance,” and then click the link that appears in the message. 5. Enter your new password twice and click the Save New Password button. A new screen appears indicating that your password has been reset. 6. Click the Click Here to Continue link to return to the sign-in screen, where you can log in once again to your account with your new password. That wasn’t too hard, now was it? That pretty much covers the Google Apps dashboard. Make sure that you get your co-workers or study group to sign up, too. That way you can work on your projects, documents, and calendars together. We won’t keep you any longer. Flip the page and get ready to dig into Google Sites and start creating your own Web site, wiki, or file sharing page. You have everything you need to start, so get going, already! Chapter 4 Exploring Google Sites In This Chapter ▶ Opening your sites ▶ Browsing other sites in your domain ▶ Creating and editing a new site ▶ Familiarizing yourself with the page elements ▶ Adding text, images, tables, gadgets, and more Now that you have a Google Account and have discovered what you can do with Google Sites, it’s time to dig in and start exploring. Google Sites is easy to use. If you’ve ever used a word processor, you already know the basics to making the most of Sites. This chapter explains how to log into Google Sites and begin creating and editing your very own site. You’ll find out how the basic tools work and be on your way to building a useful, powerful site. We also cover how to open other sites that your team has invited you to collaborate on. Opening Your Sites Getting into Google Sites is just like logging into any other Web site. After you log in, you can begin creating new sites or edit sites that already exist. When you’re ready to create a new site or open your existing sites, open your Web browser and log into Google Sites by doing one of the following: ✓ Google Account users: Go to http://sites.google.com and enter your login name and password in the Sign In box on the right side of the screen. Then click the Sign In button. ✓ Google Apps users: Go to http://sites.google.com/a/your domain.com and enter your username and password in the Sign In box on the left side of the screen. Then click Sign In. 44 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome Google Apps users can also access Sites from the Google Apps dash- board. Log into www.google.com/a/yourdomain.com and click the Sites link. The first time you log in, you see a big blue Create a Site button, like the one shown in Figure 4-1. If you’ve been invited to join a site by a friend or co- worker, you’re taken directly to the Google Sites Home, which lists all your sites along with those you’ve been invited to participate on. Figure 4-1: Click Create a Site to start building a new site. Note: If you’ve recently signed into another Google service, such as Gmail, you may be taken directly to your Google Sites Home. Navigating your Google Sites Home The Google Sites Home screen, shown in Figure 4-2, lists all the sites that you have access to. These include sites you own, sites you collaborate on, and sites you can view. From the Google Sites Home, you can search your sites, create a new site, or open an existing site. Here are the basic options avail- able on the Google Sites Home: ✓ Search Sites: Type a word or phrase in the Search Sites textbox and click the Search Sites button. Your results appear in a list. ✓ Create New Site: Click this button to create a new site. We show you how to set one up in the next section. ✓ My Sites: Click the site name link in this list to view or edit your site. Note: Unless you’ve already created a site, you may not see any links in this list the first time you log in. 45 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites Figure 4-2: The Google Sites Home shows all your active sites. Browsing other sites in your domain By default, sites created by Google Apps users are automatically shared with everyone in your domain. This means that you can begin browsing through sites that your colleagues have created without having to create one of your own. From the Google Sites Home, here’s how to browse those sites: 1. Click the Browse Sites within link from your Google Sites Home, as shown in Figure 4-2. A screen similar to Figure 4-3 appears. Figure 4-3: Click a category or use the Search tool to find a site in your domain. 2. Click a category link on the left side of the screen. Sites fitting your category appear on the right. You can also use the Search Sites box at the top of the screen. See the section, “Creating a New Site,” later in this chapter, to find out more about categories. 3. Click the title of the site you want to view. That site opens and you can begin browsing through its contents. 46 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome Accepting a site invitation In many cases, it’s likely that someone has invited you to collaborate on a site. As a collaborator, you can exercise your wiki power and make changes to the site by adding your insight and ideas. When you’re invited to participate on a site, you generally receive an e-mail invitation, like the one shown in Figure 4-4. The invitation always includes a direct link to the site and may include a brief message from the person who sent the invitation, such as instructions or a description of the site. Figure 4-4: Open a site from an e-mail invitation. To open a site you’ve been invited to, do the following: 1. From your e-mail client, locate and open your e-mail invitation. 2. Click the site link found just below the title of the site. If you haven’t already logged into Sites, you’re taken to your login screen. When you open a site created by a Google Apps user, you’re taken to the login screen for that user’s domain. If you have a normal Google Account or are not part of that user’s domain, make sure that you do the following: a. Click the Sign In with a Different Account link at the bottom of the screen. b. In the box that appears, enter your e-mail address and click the Go button. 47 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites You’re taken to your Google Apps login screen or the Google Account login screen. 3. Enter your username and password and click the Sign In button to log into Google Sites. On the next screen, you’re taken directly to the site you’ve been invited to. Note: Sites that you’ve been invited to will also appear automatically on your Google Sites Home screen. Getting back to your Google Sites Home Any time you want to switch to a different site from the one you’re on, click the My Sites link that appears to the right of your e-mail address at the top of your screen. You’re taken directly to your Google Sites Home, where you can open the sites you’re participating on or browse other sites in your domain. Knowing your role Whether you’ve created your own site or are working on one that someone else has made, you’re assigned a role that allows you to make changes to the site . . . or not. As an owner, a collaborator, or a viewer, understanding which role you have is important to knowing what changes, if any, you can make to the site. Here’s how you can tell your role: ✓ Owners: When you create a site, you are the owner. When you log into a site as an owner, you see the Edit buttons, which allow you to create new pages and edit existing pages . Owners also have ultimate power over the site settings and can permanently delete a site when it’s no longer needed. ✓ Collaborators: If you see the Edit buttons on a site that you didn’t create, chances are you’re a collaborator. You can make changes and add comments but can’t change certain site settings, and you can’t delete the site. ✓ Viewers: When you open a site and you don’t see the Edit buttons at the top of your page, you’re just a viewer. Viewers, as you may have guessed, can’t make any changes to the pages on the site. They can only sit back and watch. When you create a public site, other users are view- ers by default. 48 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome Creating a New Site After you master logging into Google Sites and finding your way around the Google Sites Home, it’s time to begin creating your very own site. Fortunately for you, creating a new site is very straightforward and takes only a few moments. Here’s how: 1. Log into your Google Sites Home. 2. Click the Create New Site button. The Create New Site screen appears, similar to Figure 4-5. 3. Enter your Site information. Here’s how that information is used: • Site name: This name appears at the top of all your pages. It’s also the name of the link that appears on your Google Sites Home screen (minus any spaces in the Site name). Figure 4-5: Enter your new site information and choose a theme 49 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites • Site location: The address to your site includes all the part in gray (refer to Figure 4-5), as well as your custom address. Note: The site location you choose may already be taken. If you get an error when you try to create your site, try entering a different name or add some numbers or letters to the end. • Site categories (optional): Only Google Apps users see this field. Enter categories here (such as Corporate, or Student Project) to help other users in your domain quickly browse to your site. Make sure that you separate multiple categories with commas. • Site description (optional): Type in a brief description of your site. Descriptions make your site easy to find and appear next to your Site Name link on the Google Sites Home screen. • Mature content (optional): Check this box if you’re hosting content that isn’t suitable for young audiences. In case you were wonder- ing, Google won’t host any ads on sites with mature content. • Collaborate with/Share with: Indicate whom you want to share your site with. To share your site with the world, click the radio button next to Everyone in the World. To keep your site private, click the Only People I Specify radio button. Google Apps users can also choose to share their site with other users in their organization by clicking the radio button next to Everyone at . • Site theme: Select a theme for your site by clicking the site theme box. You can always change your theme or customize your colors and graphics later. To view all the available themes, click the More Themes link and then choose the theme you want. 4. When you’re satisfied with your site information, click the blue Create Site button. Note: you may have to type in a garbled code before you can continue. After a few moments, your site is created, and you can begin editing it. Your site now appears on your Google Sites Home screen as well. If you change your mind about any of your site settings, you can always change them by clicking the Site Settings link in the top-right corner of your screen. Editing Pages on Your Site Now that you have a site, you’re on your way to creating one of the most useful sites on the Internet — at least for you and your team! This will be where you share your information publicly or keep your team project safe and secure. In this section, we help you know when you can edit pages, what the basic parts of a page are, and introduce the basic formatting tools that are at your disposal. 50 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome Using the Edit buttons When you’re the owner or collaborator on a site, the Create New Page and Edit Page buttons appear at the top of each page in the site. These appear in what we call View mode. Click these buttons to begin adding pages and making changes. ✓ Create a New Page: This button adds new pages to your site. As your project grows, you can add pages that work like regular Web sites, wikis, and file sharing sites. We cover how to use these new pages in Chapter 5. ✓ Edit Page: Click this button to enter Edit mode, as shown in Figure 4-6. When you’re in Edit mode, the Edit Page button is replaced by the Edit Page toolbar. Editable areas on your page are highlighted yellow and appear with a dotted outline. Figure 4-6: In Edit mode, the Edit Page toolbar appears. Header Body Sidebar Attachments Comments ✓ More Actions: The More Actions button is really a menu. Click it and you see several tools that let you organize your page and subscribe to changes. These tools are used in later chapters. ✓ Site Settings: This is also a menu that allows you to access your site sharing and appearance options. Chapter 7 digs deeper into customizing your site settings. 51 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites When you’re in Edit mode, the Edit Page and More Actions buttons are replaced by the Edit Page toolbar. After you’ve made edits to your page, click the Save or Cancel button to return to View mode. Web browsers crash from time to time. We recommend you save your page often. Google has your back, though, and in the case of an unexpected glitch, Google Sites will recover your latest work the next time you enter Edit mode. Checking out your page elements A basic page in a site has five main parts, as shown in Figure 4-6 in the pre- ceding section. ✓ Header: This is where the name of your site goes, as well as a custom logo, if you choose. We show you how to customize a header in Chapter 7. ✓ Sidebar: The Sidebar appears on either the right or left side of the body. Usually, you’ll see the Navigation box (which lists the important pages) and the Recent Site Activity box (which show pages that have been updated recently). We show you how to customize your Sidebar in Chapter 7. ✓ Body: The body contains all the information on a given page. The body of a page can contain paragraphs of text, lists of links, files, Web clips, and gadgets. When you’re in Edit mode, the body is the only part of the page that you can change. The body also has a spot for a page title. ✓ Attachments: You and your collaborators can upload files from your computer to any pages that you to allow attachments. Attachments appear on the page below the body. ✓ Comments: Get feedback on your page or share your ideas with com- ments. The Comments section appears below attachments. When you enter Edit mode, the body is the only area that can be edited directly. However, you can customize many of the other elements as well. See Chapter 7 when you’re ready to make adjustments for your whole site. Using the right toolbar for the job Users familiar with Google Docs will notice that the tools that appear in Edit mode are very similar to those found in Google Docs. Table 4-1 identifies what each of the tools on the Edit Page toolbar does. In addition to these tools, four menus provide additional options for formatting your page. These include Insert, Format, Table, and Layout. In the next sections, we cover how to use these tools to format your text and objects. 52 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome The Edit Page toolbar always appears at the top of the window, even if you scroll down on a page. This way, you have easy access to your tools even when you’re not at the top. Table 4-1 Edit Page Toolbar Commands and Shortcuts Button Command Keyboard Shortcut What It Does Save Saves your page and exits Edit mode Cancel Exits Edit mode without saving any changes you have made Undo (Last Edit) Ctrl+Z Undoes the last change you made Redo (Last Edit) Ctrl+Y Undoes the last undo Font Changes the style of the font Font Size Increases or decreases the size of the font Bold Ctrl+B Applies bold formatting Italic Ctrl+I Applies italic formatting Underline Ctrl+U Underlines words Text Color Changes the color of your text Text Background (Highlight) Color Adds a color behind words just like a highlighter pen 53 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites Button Command Keyboard Shortcut What It Does Add or remove link Ctrl+K Creates a hyperlink in your page so that readers can click to view a related Web page or other resource Numbered List Creates a numbered list Bullet List Creates a bulleted list Decrease Indent Moves paragraphs or lists half an inch to the left Increase Indent Moves paragraphs or lists half an inch to the right Left (Align Left) Aligns text to the left margin of a page Center (Align Center) Aligns text to the center of a page Right (Align Right) Aligns text to the right margin of the page Remove Formatting Ctrl+ Space Strips any format- ting, such as bold, underline, or font changes, from selected text HTML Edits the HTML code for the selected edit- able area Applying Text Formatting to Your Page Most of the buttons on the Edit Page toolbar are used for formatting. Formatting makes pages more interesting visually and makes them easier to read. You can apply formatting to your text by doing either of the following: 54 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome ✓ Select any text you want to format and click the desired button. ✓ While you’re typing, click a formatting button first to turn on the fea- ture, enter your text, and then click the formatting button again to turn off the option. Changing your body text style The body text that appears on each new page uses a font called Normal, size 10. Normal is a basic Web font without any frills. The point size refers to how big or small a font appears on-screen and in print. The higher the number, the larger the font. The default 10 point (10pt) font is large enough for most readers. To change the way your text appears, first highlight the text you want to change. Click the Font drop-down list (by clicking the little triangle shown in Figure 4-7) and choose a different font from the list, such as Georgia, Trebuchet, or Verdana. In similar fashion, to change the text size, click the Size drop-down list and choose a different point size, such as 12 or 14. Figure 4-7: Choose your font and size options from their drop-down menus on the Edit Page toolbar. The same procedure applies for changing the color of your text or placing a highlight color around your words. To change the color of text, click the Text Color button and select a color from the color palette that appears. To add a highlight color around your words, click the Highlight Color button and select the color you want from the palette. Be sure the highlight color con- trasts with the color of your text so that it can be read easily. Adding emphasis There’s nothing more basic than applying bold, italic, and underline formats to your words to help you make a point. 55 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites ✓ Bold: Makes your words appear more important, with darker, thicker letters. ✓ Italic: Slants your text onto its side to offset it from other text. ✓ Underline: Used for titles and headings, underline adds a line below the text. Underline should be used sparingly because other users may mis- take it for a link, which is usually underlined on Web pages. Removing unwanted formats Font style, color, bold, and other formats can be removed easily by selecting your text and clicking the Remove Formatting button. You can remove for- matting by either clicking the Remove Formatting button from the Edit Page toolbar or you can choose Format➪Clear Formatting. Creating lists To begin a list, click either the Numbered or Bulleted list buttons, enter the first list item, and then press Enter. Each time you press the Enter key, a new bullet or the next number appears. You can also create the entire list first, select the list, and then tap the appropriate button. Bulleted lists perform these functions (and look like this one): ✓ Display information in no particular order or sequence. ✓ Provide an easy way to organize similar types of information. ✓ Make complicated lists of information easier to read and take in. Numbered lists imply a sequence of events. You can start this kind of list by 1. Pressing the Numbered List button. 2. Entering your text. 3. Pressing Enter at the end of each paragraph. To turn bulleting or numbering off, click the buttons again. You may need to press Enter after your list ends and also tap the Decrease Indent button a few times to realign your text to the left margin, which we discuss next. Aligning your paragraphs The Increase Indent button moves a selected paragraph ½ inch to the right of the current margin. This is often used for long quotes. The Decrease Indent button does just the opposite by moving an entire paragraph ½ inch to the 56 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome left. This button is often needed to correct paragraphs that may slip out of alignment. For example, if the bullets or numbers are removed from a list, oftentimes the paragraphs remain indented improperly. Simply select the misaligned paragraphs and then click the Decrease Indent button. The Edit Page toolbar offers three one-click alignment possibilities: ✓ Left align: By default, text on pages is aligned to the left margin. This means that the text appears straight on the left margin yet is ragged on the right side, as a quick glance at the toolbar icons reveals. To move centered, right-aligned, or justified text to the default left margin, select the text and click the Align Text Left button. ✓ Center align: To center a title or an image, select your text or image and then click the Center button. You can also click the Center button first and then enter your text. ✓ Right align: Align your text on the right margin by clicking the Align Text Right button. This option is rarely used because it’s often hard to read text that is ragged on the left side of a page. The Format menu provides alternative ways of selecting the left, right, and center align commands. For example, to justify left, click Format➪Align➪Left. Power formatting with styles, superscripts, subscripts, and more The Format menu provides text styles that can help you quickly locate impor- tant information on your page. Styles are used primarily to organize your content. They are particularly handy if you want to add a table of contents for quick page navigation. The following styles can be applied by selecting your text and choosing one of these options from the Format menu: ✓ Heading (H2): The largest heading style; generally used for titles. ✓ Sub-heading (H3): A smaller heading style; sub-headings are often used for section titles. ✓ Minor heading (H4): The smallest heading style. Slightly larger than normal text, apply this style to less important section headings. ✓ Normal paragraph text: The default style for normal text. Apply the normal paragraph style to remove other styles, such as H2, H3, and H4. In the lower section of the Format menu are some other important, yet spe- cialized, formatting commands: 57 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites ✓ Strikeout: Apply this style to put a line through (or strike out) words. ✓ Superscript: Apply this style to raise text above the line. This style is used often for footnote references and exponents in mathematics, such as 23=8. ✓ Subscript: Use this style to lower the text below the line. This style is used for such things as chemical notations, as in H2O. Inserting Images, Links, Table of Contents, Lines, and Other Gadgets Sites are about more than just words. They’re meant to be dynamic, color- ful, and very useful. The Insert menu helps you do just that. To see what we mean, click the Insert menu and look at all the options. This menu allows you to insert a host of elements: images, links, table of contents, horizontal lines, content from other Google Apps, and other gadgets. Before we jump into this detailed list, it may be good to preview what some of these features actually do. Take a look at Figure 4-8. We will refer back to this figure several times in the next few pages. Figure 4-8: Elements that can be applied from the Insert menu. Adding images Inserting images is a breeze. You can insert images that already appear on other Web pages, or upload your own pictures from your computer. Follow the steps below. If you’re adding an image from another Web page, make sure that you have permission to use it on your page. Note: Clip art and images from Wikipedia are generally okay to use. 1. Click your mouse where you want the image to appear on the Page. 2. Click the Insert menu and then click the Image option. The Add an Image screen appears. 58 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome 3. Select either the Uploaded Images radio button or the Web Address (URL) radio button. Depending on which radio button you select, the steps change a bit: a. If you select the Uploaded Images radio button, click the Browse button. In the File Upload dialog box that appears, browse to your file, select it, and then click the Open button, which places the path to the file in the Browse box. b. If you select the Web Address (URL) radio button, type or paste the URL into the Image URL textbox. A preview of the image appears in the dialog box. 4. Click the Add Image button to place the image on your page, or choose Cancel to abandon the process. 5. (Optional) To make changes in how your image appears, click the image. A blue bar appears below the image with several options, as shown in Figure 4-9. Figure 4-9: Click an image to show its formatting bar. • Align: Aligns your image to the left, right, or center of the text adja- cent to the image. • Size: Changes how large your image will appear by clicking the S, M, or L options. You can also click the little white boxes around your image to resize the image manually. • Wrap: Allows the text to appear around or alongside the text. If you don’t check this option, the text is pushed below the image. • Remove: Deletes the image from your page. Google Sites can also access images directly from the Internet, so you don’t have to upload the file and you save space. When you find an image on another Web page that you want to add to your site, right-click the image and choose Copy from the menu that appears. Return to your site and open your page in Edit mode. Click where you want your image to appear and choose Edit➪Paste from your browser menu, or press Ctrl+V. Like magic, your image appears and you can make any adjustments you like. 59 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites Linking to other pages Links are very useful when you want to locate frequently used Web pages, e-mail addresses, or other online resources. To create a hyperlink on your page, select the text you want to turn into a link and click the Link button on the Edit Page toolbar or choose Insert➪Link. The Create Link window appears. From the list that appears, choose from the options below. The textbox changes depending on the option you select. ✓ Existing Page: Links to another page in your site. From the list, click the name of the page you want to link to and then click the OK button to insert the link. You can also click the Create New Page button at the bottom of the window to add a new page on the fly. ✓ Web address: Enter the URL in the textbox that appears, such as www. wikipedia.org. (Google Sites automatically adds the http:// for you.) If you need to change any of the settings above, click the linked text and click the Change link in the blue box that appears. Remove the link entirely by selecting the link and clicking the Remove link. Adding a table of contents A table of contents lists all the headings that appear on a page. When you add a table of contents to a page in Google Sites, all the titles to which you added an H2, H3, or H4 heading by using the Format menu will be listed as links; refer to Figure 4-8. Visitors can click a heading from the table of con- tents to skip directly to that section on the page. This is especially helpful for pages with lots of text, such as handbooks or manuals. To insert a table of contents, choose Insert➪Table of Contents. The Insert Table of Contents screen appears. Enter a width for your table of contents and then click Save. A placeholder for your table of contents is added to your page. As with images, to adjust the wrapping and alignment, click the place- holder and choose your options from the blue bar that appears. The table of contents does not show your links in Edit mode. When you click the Save button and preview your site, you can make sure that your table of contents appears correctly. The links are automatically updated every time you add or remove headers and click Save. 60 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome Inserting horizontal lines Horizontal lines can be placed on a page to separate sections or paragraphs. It’s like drawing a line with a pencil horizontally across a piece of paper. (To see a sample, refer to Figure 4-8.) Add a horizontal line to your page by choosing Insert➪Horizontal Line. Fitting Your Stuff in Tables Tables create little boxes in a grid pattern inside a page. By using columns and rows, tables organize certain types of information in a valuable and visual way. Follow these steps to create a table: 1. Click the Table menu and choose Insert Table. A grid appears where you can select how large you want your table to be. 2. Highlight the number of rows (down) and columns (across) that you want for your table and then click the square in the bottom-right corner. Your new table appears on your page and you can begin entering lists, numbers, and more. After you create your table, you can format the text by using the Edit Page toolbar and then insert images, links, or anything else with the Insert menu. The Table menu gives you further control over your table. From the menu you can modify, move, insert, or delete an entire table, one or more columns, one or more rows, and one or more cells. ✓ Inserting rows and columns: Place your insertion point in the column or row where you want the new row or column to appear. Click the Table drop-down list followed by Insert Row Up, Insert Row Down, Insert Column on the Left, or Insert Column on the Right. ✓ Deleting rows and columns: Select the column or row you want to delete. Click the Table drop-down list followed by Delete Table, Delete Row, or Delete Column. Moving existing columns is more problematic than moving rows. Start by inserting a new column as explained above. Select and copy the column you want to move and then paste the information into the new column. Only then should you delete the original column of information. 61 Chapter 4: Exploring Google Sites Fitting More Stuff on Your Page Although you can create an unlimited number of pages and stretch your page as long as you like, you may find it useful to keep more gadgets and other useful information at the top of your page. This is especially true for your main Home page. For this reason, you can choose between one column, which keeps things simple, or two columns, which gives you twice the space. To change the number of columns on your page, click the Layout drop-down list and choose either One-column or Two-column. The two-column layout adds an extra editable area to the body of your page. Click inside either column to add text, graphics, or other gadgets as you normally would. 62 Part I: Getting Started with Google Sites and Chrome Part II Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site In this part . . . Here we cover the bread and butter of Google Sites. Three chapters are dedicated to helping you tweak your style and fill your site with content, gadgets, and more. You also see how to add stuff from Google Docs and Google Calendar. The last two chapters help you share your site with the world. Get your team on board with your project, let your family in on the excitement, or create a site that only you can change. We show you how here. Chapter 5 Mastering Page Layouts and Tools In This Chapter ▶ Designing a Web page ▶ Using a dashboard ▶ Making announcements to have your voice heard ▶ Filling your File Cabinet ▶ Tracking projects using lists We mention at the beginning of this book that Google Sites combinesall the tools you need to create dynamic Web pages, construct power- ful wikis, and easily share files with your team, class, or family. To help make these functions possible, you can choose from five different layouts and create a site that does everything you need to get your project done or share your stuff. Each layout combines elements of the basic wiki page with a spe- cific set of easy-to-use tools to help you share your work and keep on top of your projects. Here’s a look at your layout choices. To see these pages in action, look for the sections in this chapter dedicated to each of these layouts. ✓ Web Page: Use a Web page to share information. Web pages are great for manuals or handbooks, notes, and other information. Images and gadgets add pizzazz to any Web page. ✓ Dashboard: The dashboard page brings together all the great Google Gadgets, which are like mini Web pages with dynamic content. You choose which gadgets you want, and Google takes care of updating and showing off your stuff. ✓ Announcements: When you want to make important information known, the Announcements page works wonders. This layout allows you to post news and comments in much the same way you do with a blog. ✓ File Cabinet: To make file sharing easy, the File Cabinet layout keeps your documents neat and tidy. The File Cabinet even keeps track of dif- ferent versions of your files so you can find an older copy if you need to. 66 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site ✓ List: The List layout is very flexible and lets you create virtually any type of list. From To Do lists and rosters to checklists and deadlines, you can keep track of it all with a List. After you create a new site, adding new pages and expanding your site is a breeze. This chapter starts with steps to easily add new pages to your site. Then in the following sections, you see how to use each of the tools that are specific to each layout. If you don’t have a site already, Chapter 4 goes through the steps to create one. Adding New Pages to Your Site Depending on what kind of site you want, adding a variety of pages can help you keep all of your important information handy and help you get your project done in a flash. We won’t tell you how you should organize your pages, but Part II of this book has some great suggestions for personal, work, school, and project sites. After you fill your home page and are ready to expand your site, adding pages and choosing a new page layout is simple. Here’s how: 1. Open your browser and log into your site. 2. Click the Create New Page button at the top of the page. You see a screen similar to Figure 5-1. Note: If you don’t see the Create New Page button on a site you didn’t create, you may not be allowed to make changes to the site. First, make sure that you’re logged in (there’s a login link at the bottom of the screen); then if you still can’t make changes, ask the site owner to add you as a collaborator. 3. Type the name of your new page in the Page Name textbox. You can adjust your page name later by editing the page title. 4. Click the radio button inside the box of the page layout you desire. 5. Choose where you want to put the page: • Put page at the top level. Pages that are general to your site, such as announcements or main project pages usually go here. • Put page under current page. If the page you’re creating is related to the page you were just viewing, choose this option to create a sub- page. Grouping similar pages together helps you keep your site organized. 67 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools Figure 5-1: Choose a page layout for your new page. • Choose a different location. This is helpful if you want to create a sub-page, like the preceding option. Click this link to group your page with another existing page on your site, as shown in Figure 5-2. From the list that appears, click the name of the page you want to group with and then click the Select button. Figure 5-2: Group pages by clicking an existing page from your site. 6. Click the Create Page button to add the new page to your site. Otherwise, click Cancel if you don’t want a new page after all. 68 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Adjusting page settings Each page has several options that allow you to tweak and personalize the elements that appear on your page. These settings let you show or hide ele- ments, such as the header or attachments, and allow you to add your page to the Navigation box on your site’s Sidebar. 1. Open the page whose settings you want to adjust. 2. Click the More Actions button at the top of the page and choose Page Settings from the list that appears. Note: If you are currently in Edit mode, you won’t see the More Actions button until you click Save or Cancel on the Edit Page toolbar. 3. Check the boxes next to the settings you want to enable. Uncheck the boxes to disable specific settings. Each option does something a little different. Read on to find out what each of them does. Note: Depending on the page layout, you may not see all these options. • Show This in “Navigation” in the Sidebar: By default, the Navigation box appears on the Sidebar and contains shortcuts to important pages. However, new pages aren’t automatically added to the Navigation box. Check this box to create a new link for your cur- rent page. The new link appears at the bottom of the list. • Show Page Title: Check this box to show the page title. Uncheck the box to hide any information found in the title box. Note: The title won’t be deleted; you can still edit it, you just won’t see it when you view the page. • Show Links to Sub-Pages: When you check this box, a bar appears along the bottom of the page with links to sub-pages. These links are convenient when you want to show additional information but don’t want it to take up space in the Navigation box. Note: This option may not appear for all pages. Crash course in site organization A word on Web site structure: You may want to draw a diagram of your site before you begin creating it. If you don’t know how many pages to create, look for some ideas in Part IV. When you start creating your site, you make a new page for each function you want your site to have. The structure shown in Figure 5-2 may work as a good start for a project site, but you ulti- mately decide whether you want more pages or fewer pages, depending on your organization and how much information you want to share. Don’t be limited to the options we show you in this figure. 69 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools • Allow Attachments: Check this box to enable yourself and other users to upload files to your page. When attachments are allowed, you see the Attachments bar along the bottom of the page. See the “Working with Attachments” section later in this chapter to find out how attachments work. • Allow Comments: When this box is checked, users can make com- ments to the page, including questions and suggestions. When comments are allowed, the Comments bar appears along the bottom of the page. See the “Making comments” section later in this chapter for more information. • Page URL: Each page has a specific address, usually based on the page title. Edit the shortcut name for your current page in the box below this option. The page URL appears at the end of your site address. For example, the page URL for “project-1” shows up as http://sites.google.com/site/yoursite/project-1 for Google Account users and http://sites.google.com/a/ yourdomain.com/yoursite/project-1 for Google Apps users. The page URL for your page can be found at any time on the Address bar of your Web browser. 4. When you’re finished making adjustments, click the Save button. If you don’t want to save, click the Cancel button. Working with attachments Attachments are files that you upload to a page. With Sites, they’re similar to attachments that you send to a friend or co-worker as part of an e-mail message. Just as an e-mail attachment usually has something to do with the e-mail message being sent, attachments on Google Sites are generally related to the page you upload them to. For example, if you create a page for a school field trip or a company retreat, users can attach files that include maps, itineraries, permission forms, and so on, without having to create separate pages for them. When enabled, the Attachments bar appears at the bottom of the page, as shown in Figure 5-3. Anyone you’ve shared your site with can see and open attachments, but only collaborators can upload files of their own. If you don’t see the Attachments bar at the bottom of a page, you can add it by following the steps in the preceding section. To attach your file to a page, follow these steps: 1. Click the + to the left of the title in the Attachments bar. The upload tool appears (refer to Figure 5-3). 70 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 5-3: Add files and com- ments to a page with the Attach- ments and Comments bars. 2. Click the Browse button. A dialog box appears, allowing you to open a file on your computer. Google won’t allow you to attach certain types of files, such as files ending in .exe, which may cause harm to other users’ computers. If you have trouble uploading a file, look for an orange bar at the very top of the page that describes why your file couldn’t be added. 3. On your computer, locate the file you want to attach. 4. Click the Open button. The file is automatically uploaded and attached to your page. Google keeps track of multiple versions of your attachments. When you attach a file with the exact same name as an attachment that already exists, a new Earlier Versions link appears to the right of the file. Click that link to view all revisions of the attachment. To delete an attachment, click the Remove link to the right of the attachment information. Making comments When you work on a project, post photos, and create amazing Web pages, comments allow other users to add their two cents or ask questions. As with attachments, only collaborators can post comments, but everyone that has access to your site can see them. 1. Click the + to the left of the title on the Comments bar found at the bottom of the page. A textbox appears, allowing you to add comments, similar to the one in Figure 5-3 in the preceding section. 71 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools 2. Enter your comment in the textbox. 3. Click the Add Comment button to add your suggestion or question. If you don’t like your comment or want to get rid of it, click the Remove link to the left of your name on the Comments bar. Designing a Web Page The Web page template is the most straightforward layout available. It basi- cally consists of an editable header and body. When you create a new site, your Home page uses the Web page template by default, similar to Figure 5-4. Adding text and images to your page is a snap. To find out how or to review the tools available for editing your Web page, see Chapter 4. Web pages are also great places to include gadgets, which are like mini Web pages that show specific information, such as weather or docs. Check out Chapter 6 for more information on how to use gadgets. Each of the other templates begin with the basic Web page elements at the top and then have specialized tools that allow you to upload files, post announcements, and so on. There may be times where you want to do more with your Web page than the basic tools allow, such as adding a red background color to a table. If you know a thing or two about HTML (the coding used to design Web pages), then you can add your own special touch to a page. If you want to master HTML, perform a Google search for “Learning HTML” and you will find several great resources that take you through basic HTML and style sheets. To make changes to the HTML, you must first click the Edit Page button to enter Edit mode. Click inside the header or body box and on the Edit Page toolbar, click the HTML button on the far right. A window appears that looks similar to Figure 5-5. Look for the tag you want to change and make your edits. To see what your changes look like, select the radio button in the Preview tab at the top of the window. When you’re satisfied with your changes, click the Update button at the bottom. If you decide you like your page the way it was, you can always click Cancel instead. By the way, to change your table’s background color to red, look for the tag in the HTML window and add
. 72 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 5-4: Use the Web page template to share basic information. Figure 5-5: Dig into the HTML to tweak your page. Steering toward a Dashboard Projects, personal sites, and class sites have the tendency to have a lot of information spread around on several different pages. After all, you probably want a combination of Announcements pages, File Cabinets, Web pages, and Lists. If you’re like us, it’s nice to see all your important information in one place without having to click through a bunch of pages. This is where the dashboard layout comes in handy. 73 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools A dashboard is a Web page that is filled with gadgets. Besides displaying weather and mini-games, gadgets let you see information from other pages at a glance. For your class page, a dashboard might show you recent announce- ments, course documents, and the semester calendar, similar to Figure 5-6. Figure 5-6: A dash- board shows all your infor- mation in one place. When you choose the dashboard layout, a new page is created with two columns and four placeholders for gadgets, as shown in Figure 5-7. Replace the placeholders with the gadgets of your choice to create a dashboard that works for you. Figure 5-7: The dash- board layout adds place- holders for gadgets. 74 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site If you want your gadgets to take up more space, you can change the layout so that it shows only one column. Click the Layout drop-down list and choose One-column. Note: Dashboard layouts do not show attachments or comments by default, but you can add them by clicking the More Actions button at the top of the page and choosing Page Settings from the list. Adding gadgets An advantage of the Dashboard template is that adding gadgets is a snap, using the gadget placeholders. To turn a placeholder into a gadget, click the Gadgets button in the center of the placeholder and then select a gadget from the list that appears. The Insert Gadget window appears, allowing you to enter your gadget settings. After you enter your settings, click Save to add the gadget or click Cancel instead. In most cases, your gadget won’t show any information until you exit Edit mode by clicking the Save button at the top of the screen. If you want to add additional gadgets, return to Edit mode and click your mouse inside one of the columns where you want to insert the gadget. Click the Insert drop-down list on the Edit Page toolbar and choose additional gadgets. Adjusting gadgets You may have noticed that when you add a new gadget, you enter specific information for the gadget, such as a Web address, or size dimensions. If you change your mind and want to change a setting, enter Edit mode on your page and click the gadget. A blue bar appears either above or below the gadget; in Figure 5-8, the bar appears below the gadget. Each link in the blue bar performs a specific function. Figure 5-8: Make changes to gadgets using the links in the blue bar. 75 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools ✓ Properties: Click this link to change the settings for your gadget, such as the size or page it is accessing. When you click Properties, the Edit Gadget window appears. ✓ Align: Choose which side of the page you want your gadget to hang out on. L means left, C means center, and R means right. Click each letter to find the alignment you like best. ✓ Wrap: When you have other text and graphics on your page, you can choose to have that content wrap around your gadget. On means text appears above, to the side, and below your gadget. Off means your gadget has its own space and text only appears above and below it. ✓ Remove: Click this link to make your gadget disappear. There is no undo option here, so if you accidentally remove a gadget, you must add it again using the instructions in the preceding section. Deleting gadgets It’s perfectly understandable if you want to change your page or get rid of an old gadget. To remove a gadget from your page, first enter Edit mode. Click the gadget you want to delete and wait for the blue bar to appear (refer to Figure 5-8). Click the Remove link and, in a flash, your gadget disappears into thin air. Now you can replace it with something more elegant or flashy . . . or not! Using Announcements Keep your colleagues, team members, or friends up-to-date with the Announcements layout. Announcements pages are similar to blogs. The main Announcements page lists all your posts or individual announcements, and each post is its own page. Use announcements to share your past adventures or to notify others of upcoming events. Your newest posts appear at the top of your Announcements page. Each announcement shows who wrote it and when they posted it, similar to Figure 5-9. You can edit the title and body of your Announcements page just as you would a normal Web page. Click the Edit Page button to get started. 76 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 5-9: Keep friends up- to-date with Announce- ments. Writing a new post When you’re ready to start writing your announcements, browse to your Announcements page and follow these steps: 1. Click the New Post button. A new post is created, as shown in Figure 5-10. 2. Enter a title for your post and add any information in the body below. 3. (Optional) Click the Save Draft button on the Edit Page toolbar. Drafts don’t appear in the announcements list nor can users see them. You can always edit your drafts later. Skip to the next section for more information on drafts. 4. (Optional) Add any file attachments or comments to the bottom of the page. These features are only available if you’ve enabled attachments and comments for the page. 5. When you’re ready to publish your post, click the Save button on the Edit Page toolbar. Each post is its own page on your site. Click the Sitemap link in the Navigation box on your Sidebar to locate a specific post. You can also search for posts using the search box at the top of the screen. 77 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools Figure 5-10: Edit a new announce- ment just like you would a normal Web page. Dealing with drafts When you edit new announcement posts, you’ll notice an extra button in the Edit Page toolbar that reads Save Draft. Drafts are helpful when you write a new post and don’t want to publish yet. This gives you a chance to add, edit, or change information before everyone sees it. After you create a new post, click the Save Draft button on the Edit Page tool- bar. When you return to your Announcements page, you’ll see a link to your draft posts below the “New Post” button to the right of “Your Draft Posts” (refer to Figure 5-9). Click the title of a draft post to begin editing it. After you click the Save button in a draft post, your announcement is posted. You’ll no longer see the Save Draft button when you go to make changes. Deleting old announcements When you finish with your old posts, or decide you really didn’t want to announce that surprise birthday party, you can easily go back and clean up your announcements in a jiffy. 1. Navigate to the Announcements page where the post you want to delete is located. In the Navigation box on the Sidebar, click the Sitemap link to quickly locate your Announcements page. 2. Click the title of the post you want to delete. You are taken to that post’s page. 78 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site 3. Click the More Actions drop-down list at the top of the page and choose Delete from the list that appears. A box appears asking you if you really want to delete your post. Make sure that you really don’t want to see that post again because after you click the Delete button, you won’t be given a chance to undo your action. 4. Click the Delete button to remove your post or click Cancel if you decide you want to keep it after all. When your post is deleted, you return to the Announcements page. Filling Your File Cabinet A project can be simple or complex, but regardless of its size, your team is likely going to need to keep track of all sorts of documents to get it done. That’s where the File Cabinet template comes in handy. Any of your team mem- bers can add documents, spreadsheets, archives, PDFs, music files, and so on, to your File Cabinet. The File Cabinet is also a great place to back up your important files in case something happens to your computer. All in all, the File Cabinet is one of the most useful templates on your site. (See Figure 5-11.) Figure 5-11: Keep track of multiple files with the File Cabinet. Each Google Site holds up to 100 megabytes of pictures, documents, and other attachments. For most projects that’s plenty of storage space. However, you may have to go back and delete files if your site stops accepting your files. 79 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools Just as you can with a normal Web page, you can edit the title and body of your File Cabinet page. Click the Edit Page button to get started. Adding files Uploading your documents is a cinch. Just follow these steps and you’ll have everything you need for your project in one place in no time. To add any of your Google Docs to your page, look at Chapter 6. 1. Click the Add File button. The Add File window appears. 2. (Optional) Choose the file you want to add from your computer. Here’s how: a. Click the radio button next to the option for Your Computer. b. Click the Browse button. c. In the dialog box that appears, locate the file on your computer. d. Click Open. You return to your File Cabinet page. 3. (Optional) Choose the file you want to add from the Web. Here’s how: a. Click the radio button next to the option for The Web (Paste in URL). b. In another browser window or tab, navigate to the file you want to attach. c. In your browser’s address bar, highlight the URL where the file is located and then choose Edit➪Copy or press Ctrl+C on your key- board. d. Return to your File Cabinet page. e. Click inside the first box and choose Edit➪Paste or press Ctrl+V on your keyboard to paste the URL. f. (Optional) In the textbox next to Text to Display, type a short name for your file. 4. (Optional) In the File Description field, enter a brief description of your file’s contents. 5. Click the Upload button. After a few moments, the window closes and you return to your File Cabinet page. Your file should appear. Note: If you upload a file with the same name as a file that already exists in your File Cabinet, the old file is backed up and the newest version appears in the list. See “Tracking Files” later in this section for more information. 80 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Organizing files Life can get a little crazy at times, and your File Cabinet can quickly become overrun by unruly files. Fortunately, there’s an easy way to group files into folders so that you can keep on top of your projects or files collection. To move files to a folder, check the box next to the file or files you want to move. Click the Move To button at the top of the list. If you already have a folder, you can choose it from the list. Otherwise, click the New Folder option from the list. In the New Folder window that appears, enter a name for your folder and click the Save button. Your folder is created and your selected files are automatically added to it. To get rid of a folder, click the Remove link to the right of the folder name. A warning dialog box appears, letting you know that all the files in that folder will be deleted. Click the Delete button to remove your folder and related files. If you want to delete a folder but not the files in it, check the box to the left of the files you want to keep and then move them to another folder. You can then remove your old folder without worrying about losing your files. Deleting files To remove files from your File Cabinet, check the box to the left of the file names and then click the Delete button at the top of the list. After you delete a file, no one can access previous versions of the file until another copy is uploaded. All previous versions of the file are hidden, and there’s no quick undo option when you delete the file. Tracking files When a file has been uploaded more than once, the File Cabinet page auto- matically archives the old version and replaces it with the new one. This is helpful when you want to keep track of progress on a project or look up infor- mation that is found only in an older version. To track files, click the little version number (v. #) link to the right of the file name. (The file shown in Figure 5-11 shows a v.5 link.) You’ll see a list of all the previous versions of the file, similar to Figure 5-12. Click any Version link to open that version of the file. Newer versions appear at the top of the list. When you finish, click the Back to Page link at the top of the page to return to your File Cabinet. 81 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools Figure 5-12: Keep track of multiple versions of your documents. Following changes to your File Cabinet You shouldn’t have to check your File Cabinet every day to see what has been added and changed. Let Google Sites notify you automatically when changes happen. Click the Subscribe to Changes button. You receive an e-mail from the site identifying the file name and who added or changed the file. The e-mail also contains links that take you directly to the file or File Cabinet page. If you don’t want to cramp your Inbox, return to your File Cabinet page and click Unsubscribe from Page Changes. You can also click the Unsubscribe Me link in any of the notification e-mails. Tracking Projects Using Lists The last layout available for your new page is a List. Everyone loves lists. Whether you’re going grocery shopping, assigning people things to do, or making sure that your project is moving along at a good rate, the List layout can help. When you create a new List page, you have several predefined list templates to choose from, as follows: ✓ Action Items: After your high-powered meeting with your team, use an action items list to follow up. The default columns are Owner, Description, Resolution, and Complete. With Action Items, you always know what still needs to be done before your next meeting. 82 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site ✓ Issue List: For projects that have issues in need of support, the Issue List is very helpful. Columns include Raised by, Owner, Priority, Issue, and Resolution. In a classroom setting, an Issue list could be used to keep track of student topics or questions. ✓ Unit Status: Use Unit Status to keep track of different items, such as widget components. (See Figure 5-13.) The Unit Status list has the fol- lowing columns: Status, Owner, Feature, and Design (URL). The URL is useful for linking documents, Web sites, or order pages needed for your project. ✓ Custom List: Let your imagination go wild with custom lists. Choose as many columns as you like, name them what you like, and select from dif- ferent field types. Figure 5-13: A Unit Status list helps you keep track of projects. To start adding items to your new list, click the Use This Template button or the Create a Custom List button under the template. You find out more about Custom Lists in the next section. You can edit the title and body of your List page just as you would a normal Web page. Click the Edit Page button to get started. Customizing your list To make sure that your list keeps track of exactly what you want it to, you have the option of creating a custom list or changing an existing list. Here’s how: 83 Chapter 5: Mastering Page Layouts and Tools 1. Click the Customize This List link to the right of the Add Item button. The Customize Your List window appears. 2. Enter the column name in the Column Name field. 3. Choose a column type from the Type drop-down list. 4. (Optional) Add a new column by clicking the Add a Column link below your column list. 5. (Optional) Change the order of the columns by clicking a column title and then clicking the white up or down arrow that appears to the right of your column name. Note: The column title at the top of the list will be the farthest to the left on your page. 6. (Optional) To delete a column or field, click the name of the column you want to delete and then click the white X that appears to the right. 7. When you’re done customizing your list, click the Save button. You can also click the Cancel button if you want to discard your changes. Adding list items To add list items, click the Add Item button. A screen appears containing fields for each of the columns on your list. Here are some things to keep in mind when you fill in information: ✓ In textboxes, enter text as you want it to appear on your list. You can enter small items, such as names, or large paragraphs and descriptions. ✓ For check boxes, click the box and a check appears on your list. ✓ URLs use two fields. Enter the address of the Web page you want to link to in the first box and enter a short description of the page in the second box. The description appears as a link to the long Web address. Updating list items Lists change. While your project progresses or when tasks get accomplished, you’ll likely want to update your list items. Hover your cursor on the list item you want to change. Click the list item to make the Edit Item screen appear, as shown in Figure 5-14. 84 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 5-14: Click a list item to begin editing it. When you finish updating your list item, click the Save button to return to your list. If you decide you don’t like your changes, click the Cancel button instead. Deleting list items When you finish with a list item or want to delete an item, click the item, and then click the Delete This Item link at the bottom of the Edit Item screen. The item disappears immediately. If you delete an item by accident, don’t fret — Google Sites allows you to undo your last action. Look for the orange bar that appears at the very top of your screen and then click the Undo link. Sorting your lists Ordering your lists is a piece of cake. Sorting comes in handy when you want to group lists by people, dates, or other criteria. The Sort bar appears below the column titles (refer to Figure 5-13). Click the Sort drop-down list below the column you want to organize and then click the order you want from the list that appears: ✓ A–Z: Sort the column in ascending order. Numbers appear at the top of the list. ✓ Z–A: Sort the column in descending order. Numbers appear at the bottom. Chapter 6 Adding Gadgets In This Chapter ▶ Enmeshing content from other pages ▶ Inserting content from other Google Apps ▶ Grabbing photos and video from the Web ▶ Browsing the Google Gadgets Directory Gadgets are the bread and butter of Google Sites. They make it easy to add engaging content, share important files, and keep on top of proj- ects. Add that you don’t need to know any computer code to add gadgets, and you’ve got a recipe for success. Adding gadgets is a snap. When you’re editing a page, simply choose a gadget from the Insert menu, enter a few details in the window that pops up (such as how much space you want the gadget to take on your page), and voilà! Your gadget magically appears, making your site more useful than ever. This chapter helps you harness the power of gadgets. You add content from other Google Apps (which you find out about in Part V), mix up information from other pages on your site, and insert gadgets that share information from the Internet, including weather, news, games, and more. By the time you’re finished, we’re confident that you’ll be a gadget master. Inserting Gadgets In case you missed it, gadgets on Google Sites are like mini Web pages that share specific pieces of information. Whether you use a dashboard layout, as we mention in Chapter 5, or simply share some information on a page, gad- gets are sure to make your site more engaging. Figure 6-1 shows an example of a page with multiple gadgets. 86 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 6-1: Gadgets add punch to your site. The process of adding gadgets is pretty straightforward. Basically, you open a page on your site, click the Edit Page button and then begin inserting gad- gets. Although each gadget may deviate a little from the examples we include here, they tend to have some common elements we explain upfront so we don’t have to repeat ourselves. Here are the basics of adding a gadget to your page: 1. Open your browser and navigate to the page on your site where you want to add a gadget. 2. Click the Edit Page button to enter Edit mode. 3. Click the Insert menu at the top of the screen and choose a gadget from the list that appears. An Insert Gadget screen appears. 4. Enter the settings you want to customize. Each gadget may have different settings, but a few common ones exist: • Height: Indicate how many points or pixels (px) high you want your gadget. If you want your gadget to fit on the screen, keep in mind that standard Web browsers are about 670px high. • Width: Enter the number of pixels wide you want your gadget. If you leave this number blank, the gadget will adjust to fit its con- tent or stretch across and fill the column or screen. 87 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets • Include Border Around Your Gadget: Check this box to show a thin border around your gadget. The color of the border will match your site’s scheme. To change the color, see Chapter 7. • Include Title: Check this box and enter a title for your gadget to have that name appear in the top border of the gadget. 5. Click the Save or Insert button, whichever appears. You’re taken to your site and a placeholder for your gadget appears on your page. To see your gadget in action, click the Save button at the top of the screen. That’s it. Some gadgets require a few more steps or details than this, such as a page or calendar; we walk you through the more complicated ones in the next sections. To adjust your gadget settings later, click the Edit Page button on the page with your gadget to begin editing. Click the placeholder for your gadget and then click the Properties link in the blue bar that appears. When you’re done, click Save. From this blue bar, you can align your gadget by clicking the L (left), C (center), or R (right) links, and also turn text wrapping on or off. Meshing Content from Other Pages on Your Site Let’s face it — you can create a lot of different types of pages — Lists, Announcements, File Cabinets, and more. After a while, it can become over- whelming to keep track of them. Although the Sitemap link on the Sidebar helps you find everything fast, and the Search Site tool points you to the right spot even faster, we know how nice it is to have all of your important infor- mation together on a page. Chapter 5 introduces you to the dashboard page. Here we help you make the most of your dashboard and the gadgets you really need to keep your family, friends, or team on the right track. In the next section, we cover the options you need to know to show off infor- mation from your Announcements, File Cabinets, and Lists, and we show you how to create textboxes with extra tidbits for your visitors or collaborators. Incorporating announcements When you have an Announcements page, you can add an Announcements gadget to a Web page or dashboard to quickly show your most recent posts. This is particularly helpful for relaying your most recent posts to your family and friends or updating your team about a project, as shown in Figure 6-2. 88 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 6-2: Keep track of your project with gadgets. Insert the Announcements gadget as you would any other gadget. First, open the page you want to add the gadget to and click the Edit Page button. From the Edit Page toolbar, choose Insert➪Recent Posts. The Insert Recent Announcements screen appears. Adjust your settings, in particular these two: ✓ Show Posts from: From this list, choose the Announcements page you want to see headlines from. All the Announcements pages on your site appear in this list. ✓ Number of Posts to Show: Enter the number of entries you want to show. When you’re done, click Save to add your gadget. Click Save on the Edit Page toolbar to see the gadget in action on your page, displaying the most recent posts from your Announcements page. Previewing the File Cabinet The File Cabinet helps you keep track of files, but like Announcements, some- times you want quick access to the most recent additions or changes. The File Cabinet gadget, shown toward the bottom in Figure 6-2, lets you do just that. 89 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets 1. Open the page on which you want to display your most recent files and click the Edit Page button. 2. From the Edit Page toolbar, choose Insert➪Recently Updated Files. The Insert Recent Files screen appears. 3. Choose your settings and then click Save. Be sure to choose which File Cabinet page you want to show, and how many files you want to see. A placeholder appears on your page for your new gadget. 4. When you’re finished, click Save at the top of the page to reveal your recent files. Abbreviating your lists Use the Lists gadget to display the most recent additions or changes to a list on your page. This is very helpful when you want to keep track of how a proj- ect is progressing or to quickly see what’s on your To Do list. On your page, click the Edit Page button and then choose Insert➪Recent List Items on the Edit Page toolbar. The Insert Recent List Items screen appears. Choose the settings you want for your lists. Here, you have a few more options to keep track of: ✓ Show List Items from: Choose the list page you want to show items from by clicking this menu and clicking the page title. ✓ Select the Columns You Wish to Display: When you’ve chosen your list, all the columns from that page appear. Check the box next to each column title to show it on your page. If you only want to see a few or have limited space on your page, check only the most important columns. ✓ Number of List Items to Show: Enter the number of items you want to show. Only the most recent additions to your list will appear on your page. ✓ Sorted by: From this drop-down list, choose the column by which you want to sort your list items. When you finish adjusting the Lists gadget, click Save; a placeholder appears on your page. Click Save on the Edit Page toolbar to see your gadget in action, with your list items all in a row! 90 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Creating your own textbox When you have content to place on your page but don’t know exactly what to do with it, there’s one more gadget we like that you can use — Text Box. Think of this gadget as you would a textbox in your word processor. It provides a place where you can highlight a point, add a quote, or set aside random stuff that you just can’t find a place for on your page. To add a textbox to your page, 1. Click the Edit Page button on the page. 2. Choose Insert➪Text Box from the Edit Page toolbar. The Insert Text Box screen appears. 3. Use the Edit Page toolbar in the Insert Text Box screen to add any images, links, and other tidbits you want to appear. When you’re done, click the Save button. A placeholder appears on your page. 4. Click the Save button on the Edit Page toolbar to see your textbox with the rest of your gadgets and page content. Sharing Information from Other Google Apps If you’re using Google Sites to help your team stay on top of its game, chances are you’ve toyed with the other Google Apps. Specifically, Google Calendar is extremely useful in helping organize your time, and Google Docs is a perfect app to share up-to-date documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. In this section, you discover how to add a Calendar gadget to your site and insert documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. Showing a calendar on your site One of the most useful gadgets we’ve found shows events from your Google Calendar right on your page. Whether you want to keep track of meetings or let family know about important events, the Calendar gadget is perfect for keeping everyone up-to-date. 91 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets You have three views to choose from when including your calendar. Week and Month views are useful when you want to dedicate a whole page to your calendar. However, when you want to keep things concise and not take up a lot of space, we recommend you look at Agenda view, as shown in Figure 6-3. Agenda view shows all of your events for the next 30 days with the upcoming appointments at the top. Figure 6-3: Agenda view shows your upcoming events in a scrolling list. To find more about creating and using a Google Calendar, be sure to check out Chapter 18. Here’s how to add a Calendar gadget to your site: 1. Open your Calendar in a new browser window or tab. 2. In the My Calendars list, click the down arrow to the right of the cal- endar you want to share. 3. Choose the Calendar Settings link from the menu that appears. 4. Scroll down the Calendar Settings page and click the blue HTML button in the Calendar Address section. A new screen appears, revealing your calendar’s Web address. 5. Right-click the address link and choose Copy or Copy Link Address (depending on your browser) from the menu that appears. 6. Open your Google Sites and locate the page where you want to place your calendar. 7. Click the Edit Page button at the top of your screen to switch to Edit mode. 8. On your page, click your cursor where you want your calendar, and then choose Insert➪Calendar. The Calendar Properties screen appears. 92 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site 9. Right-click the first box in the Insert Calendar screen and choose Paste from the menu that appears. Your calendar address should now appear in the box. 10. Adjust these settings to your liking: • View: Choose an option in this drop-down list to change your cal- endar view. Week shows a week’s worth of events. Month shows a full month, similar to a wall calendar. Agenda adds a scrolling list of all the events coming up in the next month with the closest events at the top(refer to Figure 6-3). • Show Week, Month, and Agenda Tabs: Check this box to show tabs on the top of your calendar. Anyone who views the calendar on your Site will be able to change the view to show the week, month, or agenda view. • Show Calendar Name: This option reveals the name of your calen- dar at the top of the gadget. • Show Navigation Buttons: Navigation buttons allow anyone who sees your calendar to move forward and backward through months and weeks. When this option is checked, a back button and a forward button appear in the top-left corner of your Calendar gadget. • Show Current Date Range: This option shows the dates, for a given period, on the top of the Calendar gadget. 11. Click the Save button to insert your calendar and return to your site. A placeholder for your gadget appears until you save your page. Click Save on the Edit Page toolbar to see your calendar as it will appear normally. Presenting a document, spreadsheet, or presentation Google Docs is an online office suite with which you can create and edit doc- uments, spreadsheets, and presentations from any computer with an Internet connection. One of the reasons to use Google Docs along with Google Sites is that you can share the most up-to-date version of your documents, spread- sheets, and presentations on your site without having to re-upload files or constantly publish new changes. This is because when you save your changes to your documents online, your site automatically updates and shows the latest information. The gadgets for documents, spreadsheets, and presentations actually display your entire document within a small frame on your page, similar to Figure 6-4. In the case of presentations, a small slideshow frame appears, allowing visi- tors and team members to view your most current presentation. 93 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets Figure 6-4: Show off a spreadsheet directly from your page. Because Google Docs is key to sharing information on your site, we dedicate four chapters of this book to getting you up to speed. See Chapters 14–17 for more about Google Docs. When you’re ready to share a document, spreadsheet, or presentation, here’s how to place it on your page: 1. In your browser, navigate to the page on your site where you want to share your document. 2. Click the Edit Page button at the top of the screen to begin editing your page. 3. From the Edit Page toolbar, choose Insert➪Document (or Spreadsheet or Presentation). The Insert screen appears. 4. Choose a document from the list on the right of the screen and click the Select button. After you click the Select button, the Insert Document screen appears. Note: Use the list on the left side of the screen to navigate through your Google Docs. You can also search for a document by entering a term in the Search box at the top of the Insert screen and clicking Search. 5. Adjust any of your gadget settings (shown in Figure 6-5) and then click the Save button. A placeholder for your document, spreadsheet, or presentation appears on your page. 94 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 6-5: Adjust your document gadget settings. 6. Click the Save button on the Edit Page toolbar to see your document, spreadsheet, or presentation as it will appear on your site. You can always change your settings later by clicking the gadget place- holder and clicking the Properties link that appears. Linking to your documents If you don’t want to show your whole document within a gadget, you can insert a link to your document instead. This is particularly helpful when you want to share a Web presentation and have other users join in and follow along. Here’s how to link to your document: 1. Open your document in Google Docs. 2. Click the Share button at the top and choose Publish as Web Page from the popup menu that appears. 3. On the next screen, click Publish Document. A link to your document appears. 4. Right-click the link and choose either Copy Link Address or Copy Shortcut (depending on your browser) from the menu that appears. 5. Return to your site and click the Edit button. 6. From the Edit Page toolbar, choose Insert➪Link. 7. Click the Web Address option in the window that appears and then paste the link to your document in the Link to This URL box. 8. Click OK and then click Save to save your page. Visitors to your site can now open the document directly from your page. 95 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets Inserting charts In addition to adding spreadsheets, it’s possible to show charts and gadgets from Google Docs as well. Like your other Google Docs, spreadsheet charts and gadgets are automatically updated on your site whenever you change the document itself. Here’s how to add a chart or gadget: 1. Open your Google spreadsheet containing a chart or graph in a sepa- rate browser window. 2. Click the chart, and from the Chart drop-down menu that appears above it, choose Publish Chart. 3. Click OK on the dialog box that appears (you’ll be re-publishing your spreadsheet) and the Publish Chart screen appears, revealing the URL for the chart image. 4. Select only the URL text found inside the quotes and copy it. 5. In another browser window, navigate to the page on your site where you want to add the chart and click the Edit Page button. 6. From the Insert menu, choose Image. The Add an Image screen appears. 7. Click the Web Address (URL) link on the left side of the screen. 8. Inside the Image URL box, select the http:// text and paste the address of your chart. A preview of your chart image appears in the box underneath. If you don’t see your chart, check your chart’s address. 9. Click the Add Image button to insert your chart and return to your site. 10. Click the Save button to save your changes and view your chart. Gather information with a spreadsheet form Another great use of Google Docs is collecting information from your site into a spreadsheet. This is useful for conducting informal polls, creating a mailing list, or having guests you’ve invited RSVP to a party. This is a two-part process. To start collecting information, you need to create (and save your responses into) a spreadsheet. Check out Chapter 16 to find more about spreadsheets. 96 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Here’s Part 1: 1. In your browser, open Google Docs. 2. Click the New button and choose Form from the list that appears. The New Form screen appears in a new window, similar to Figure 6-6. Figure 6-6: Create a new form in Google Docs. 3. Enter a form title and description in the first two textboxes, provide the Question Title and Help Text information, and then choose a ques- tion type from the Question Type drop-down list. 4. (Optional) For list questions, enter the items you want your respon- dents to choose from. 5. Click Done when your question looks good. 6. (Optional) Click the Add Question button to create additional ques- tions by repeating Steps 3 through 5. 7. Click Save to save your new form. 8. At the bottom of the screen, right-click the link inside the black box and choose either Copy Link Location or Copy Shortcut (depending on your browser) from the menu that appears. Now that you have a form, it’s time to add it to your page. Here’s Part 2: 1. Open the page where you want to insert your form and click the Edit Page button. 97 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets 2. From the Edit Page toolbar, choose Insert➪Spreadsheet Form. The Insert Spreadsheet form appears. 3. In the first textbox, paste the address for your spreadsheet form by pressing Ctrl+V on your keyboard or right-clicking your mouse and choosing Paste from the menu that appears. 4. Adjust any other settings and then click Save. A placeholder for your form appears on your page. Click Save on the Edit Page toolbar to see your form in action. Any visitors to your site can now answer your questions and give you the information you’re looking for. To review the responses, return to Google Docs, open your form, and then click the View Responses button. Grabbing Video and Photos from the Web There was a time when the Internet was just about words — text on pages that linked to text on other pages. Although it’s true that most of the informa- tion on the Web is text, video and photos have become an important source of information, entertainment, and sharing. If you don’t believe us, check out YouTube (www.youtube.com) or do a search on Google Video (http:// video.google.com) and see how many millions of videos are out there. Showing video to your group with YouTube or Google Video While you’ve browsed the Internet, you’ve undoubtedly come across a blog or Web site that includes a little video clip. Welcome to the YouTube genera- tion. You can join in the fun and show off clips of your own on your site using the Google Video gadget. Before you can place a clip on your site, you have to find the video clip first. Go to either www.youtube.com or http://video.google.com and search for the video clip you want on your page. Highlight the URL in the address bar and copy it. Open the page where you want the video clip to appear and click the Edit Page button. From the Edit Page toolbar, choose Insert➪Video➪Google Video or YouTube, depending on where you found your original clip. The Insert YouTube Video screen appears. Paste the URL in the first textbox, adjust any of the other settings, and click Save to insert your video. Click Save on the Edit Page toolbar to view your video. 98 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Viewing slideshows with Picasa Web If a photo is worth a thousand words, imagine what a whole album of photos is worth! Google Sites is a great place to show off your photos, especially if your site is personal or shared with your family. The Picasa Web Slideshow gadget is a Google gadget for photo albums that displays images from Picasa Web Albums, Google’s free online photo-storage service. Although we don’t cover creating Picasa Web Albums in this book, we recom- mend you play around with it if, like us, photos play an important role in your life or project. Managing your photos online and offline Picasa Web Albums (http://picasaweb. google.com) is a free service from Google that allows you to upload and share your photos online. In addition to storing your photos online, Google provides free photo-editing and photo- organizing software called Picasa (www. picasa.com). After you download and install Picasa, it takes only a few clicks to enhance your photos, organize them into folders, and e-mail or print them. Best of all, Picasa syncs your photos with your online Picasa Web Albums so you can share them with the world, or more impor- tant, add them to your site with the Picasa Web Slideshow gadget! 99 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets After you create some Picasa Web Albums and upload your photos, here’s how to show them on your page: 1. In your browser, navigate to the Picasa Web Album you want to share. You can create and access your albums at http://picasaweb. google.com. Click the album cover of the album you want to share to view your photos. 2. Highlight the album URL in the address bar and copy the address by pressing Ctrl+C on your keyboard or right-clicking the address and choosing Copy from the menu that appears. 3. Navigate to the page on your site where you want to add the Slideshow gadget. 4. Click the Edit Page button to reveal the Edit Page toolbar. 5. From the Edit Page toolbar choose Insert➪Picasa Web Slideshow. The Insert Picasa Web Slideshow window appears. 6. Paste the URL of your Picasa Web Album in the first textbox. Press Ctrl+V on your keyboard or right-click the box and choose Paste from the menu that appears. 7. Adjust your other presentation options: • Select Slideshow Size: Choose how large you want the Slideshow gadget to appear. You can always try different sizes by adjusting your gadget later. • Show Captions: If the photos in your Picasa Web Album have descriptions or long file names, you can click this option and they will appear in the presentation at the bottom of each photo. • Autoplay: Choose this option to have your presentation cycle through your photos automatically. If you don’t check this option, a play button appears on your Slideshow gadget and visitors to your site will have to start the presentation manually. 8. When you finish adjusting your Slideshow gadget options, click the Save button. A placeholder for your gadget appears on your page. Click the Save button on the Edit Page toolbar to see the Slideshow gadget in action. Browsing the Google Gadgets Directory Adding other Google gadgets is a snap. Google maintains a directory of hun- dreds of gadgets that companies and users have created that put useful and entertaining tools at your fingertips. Some gadgets can even let you access information from all of your Google Apps on one page. 100 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Checking out the gadget directory To access the gadget directory, click Insert on the Edit Page toolbar and choose More from the bottom of the list that appears. The directory appears, similar to Figure 6-7. (The gadgets that appear may vary because Google users create new gadgets all the time.) Browse through the categories, and when you find a gadget you like, click the gadget link or preview image to begin adjusting the gadget’s settings. In addition to browsing these categories, you can enter a search term at the top of the gadget directory and click the Search button to find a specific gadget. If you’re interested in making a gadget for your page, search Google for make your own gadget or visit www.google.com/ig/gmchoices. If you’re using Google Apps, you can create your own version of a Start Page by adding gadgets that give you access to your personal calendar and docs or allow you to chat with your contacts. The following sections show you how. Figure 6-7: Find gadgets in the gadget directory. Don’t confuse the following gadgets with the ones we discuss earlier in this chapter. Although the earlier gadgets let you share your public documents or calendars, the following gadgets are for your eyes only. When you open your site, the following gadgets show you your personal files and only you can see them, similar to Figure 6-8. 101 Chapter 6: Adding Gadgets Figure 6-8: Use gadgets to create your own personal dashboard. Seeing what’s happening on your personal calendar Use the Google Calendar gadget to keep on top of what’s going on. In the gadget directory, search for Google Calendar. If you access your page after you log into your Google Account, you see the following additional features: ✓ Create Event: Opens a new window and lets you add a new appointment directly to your calendar. ✓ Show/Hide Agenda: View your upcoming events in the gadget. You can also click a day on the mini calendar to see events for that day. Click Hide Agenda if you don’t want to see your events here. If you don’t see the Google Calendar gadget on your page, click the Add Stuff link, click the Google Apps link, and finally, click the Add It Now button below the Google Calendar gadget. Turn to Chapter 18 to discover more about Google Calendar. You can customize your calendar settings to edit your date and time format, as well as show and hide the mini calendar. 102 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Viewing your latest docs The Google Docs gadget displays your most recent documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. To access the Google Docs gadget, first click the Edit button on your page, and then choose Insert➪More, search for Google Docs. Click the Google Docs link for the first gadget that appears, and then click OK. This gadget may ask you to sign into Google Docs before it shows your cur- rent list. Click the Sign In link to go to your docs. When you return to the page (simply reenter your page’s Web address in your browser), your list will show your recent docs. Here are the key Google Docs links: ✓ New: Click this menu to create a new document, presentation, or spread- sheet directly from the gadget. ✓ View All Items: Go directly to your Docs Home and view all your documents. The Google Docs gadget shows five documents by default. You can edit the gadget settings to preview more or less, and to hide or show the last edit date. Chatting with your contacts Use the Google Talk gadget to see whether your contacts are online and to chat with them. The Google Talk gadget, shown in Figure 6-8, gets a whole section in Chapter 20, so we don’t go into details about how to use it here. To add the Google Talk gadget to your page, click the Edit Page button, and then choose Insert➪More from the Edit Page toolbar. Search for Google Talk, click the Google Talk link for the first gadget that appears, and then click OK. When you’re done, click Save. Note: You may need to click the Sign In link to load Google Talk the first time. Chapter 7 Customizing Your Site’s Look and Feel In This Chapter ▶ Using a theme ▶ Improving your site with site elements ▶ Changing your site’s color and fonts Your site should be special, have a splash of personality, and be invit- ing to everyone who collaborates on or visits it. Or, you can opt for a utilitarian approach, where function and a clean presentation are essential. Whatever your preference, Google Sites has a set of simple tools to make your site look just how you want. In this chapter, we look at changing your site’s theme, choosing how the page elements appear, and tweaking the colors to match your personality or team scheme. Figure 7-1 shows a sample site where the logo, theme, and layout have been personalized to fit the needs of a classroom site. If you’re still look- ing for ideas after exploring this chapter, check out Part IV for more customi- zation goodness. 104 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Figure 7-1: A custom theme adds personality and pizzazz to your site. Sticking with a Theme When you first create a site, you have the option to choose a Google-designed theme. Fortunately, if you’re tired of your theme or want to mix things up a bit for your team, you’re just a few clicks away from applying a fresh coat of color. These steps will have you going with a new theme in no time at all: 1. Log into your site. 2. Click the Site Settings button at the top of the screen and choose Change Appearance from the list that appears. A new screen appears, allowing you to adjust your site settings. 3. On the blue bar, click the Appearance link. 4. Click the Themes link. You see a large grid of designs used in each theme, as shown in Figure 7-2. 5. Select the radio button next to the theme you want to use and then click the Save Changes button at the top of the screen. To see what your site looks like with any of the themes available, click the Preview link below the theme title. A new window appears, showing your site with the new look. Before you save your changes, it’s a good idea to make sure that the theme you’ve selected is the right one by clicking the Preview button at the top of the screen. 105 Chapter 7: Customizing Your Site’s Look and Feel Figure 7-2: Preview and select a new theme from Site Settings. 6. When you finish, return to your site by clicking the Google Sites logo or the Return to Site link in the top-left corner of the screen. Your site now appears with your new theme, including colors and back- ground images. If the new theme doesn’t appear right away, click the refresh button on your Web browser. Working Magic with Site Elements In Chapter 4, we explain the different site elements, including the header, sidebar, and body of a page on your site. With a little bit of tweaking, the dif- ferent parts of your site don’t need to be the same as everyone else’s. This section is dedicated to helping you customize the physical location of all the content on your site, as well as add a custom logo for your project or team. To begin tweaking your site elements, follow these steps to dig into your site settings: 1. Log into your site. 2. Click the Site Settings link in the top-right corner of the screen. 3. On the blue bar, click the Appearance link. The Appearance screen appears. 106 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site 4. Click the Site Elements tab. The Site Elements screen appears, similar to Figure 7-3. Here you notice the Change Site Layout button, and options to adjust the Header, Sidebar, and Page Content. We cover these in this section. Figure 7-3: The Site Elements screen lets you adjust your site layout, logo, and sidebar. 5. When you’re finished making adjustments on this screen, click the Save Changes button at the top of the screen and then click the Return to Site link to see your new layout. If your site has the Sidebar enabled, you can go straight to the Site Elements tab by clicking the Edit Sidebar link below the Sidebar on any page in your site. Changing your site layout Each of the elements on your site takes up a certain amount of space on your screen. Click the Change Site Layout button on the Site Elements screen to change how much space each of the elements uses. The Change Site Layout screen appears. This is where you’ll adjust the page. The Change Site Layout screen offers the following options: ✓ Site Width: You have the option to have your site stretch across the screen or fill a fixed width. A fixed width centers your content on the page, similar to a blog (see Figure 7-4). Enter a number and choose Percent to have the contents of the site stretch, or enter a number of pixels (700–900 is pretty standard) to create a centered page. 107 Chapter 7: Customizing Your Site’s Look and Feel ✓ Header: Check this box to show the header, which includes your logo, site name, and search box. ✓ Sidebar: Check this box to use the Sidebar and Sidebar items, such as Navigation, Countdown, and other gadgets. Also, select a radio button to place the Sidebar on the left or right side of the screen. Additionally, indicate how wide you want the Sidebar to be; 150px is the standard. Figure 7-4: A fixed- width page looks more like a blog. After you adjust your site layout, click OK to return to your site settings. Click the Preview button to see your new settings in a new window, and then click Save Changes if you like what you see. Choosing your site logo A generic site shows the Google Sites logo in the top-left corner of every page you create. Although it’s nice to promote Google, we prefer having our own image there, whether a company logo, school mascot, or team photo. The page shown in Figure 7-4 has a school logo, and we think it suits that page. Before you choose a custom logo, you must save the logo image to your computer and adjust the size to your liking. Acceptable logos should also be in JPEG, GIF, or PNG format. On a Windows computer, you can use Paint to resize your image, and then save it as one of these three formats. If your group has a logo available on the Web, navigate to the page where the image is, right-click the image, and then choose Save As or Save Image (depending on your browser). Name your image and save it in an easy-to-remember loca- tion, such as your desktop or Documents folder. 108 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site Only use images that you have the right to use. You could get in trouble for using copyrighted and other restricted images on your site. When you’re ready to choose a new logo, follow these steps: 1. Navigate to the Site Elements page in your Site Settings. 2. In the light blue Header box, click the Change Logo link. The Configure Site Logo screen appears, similar to Figure 7-5. Figure 7-5: Choose the default logo, a custom logo, or no logo. 3. Select the radio button next to your logo option. Domain Logo shows your organization’s logo if you’re using Google Apps. Custom Logo displays the logo of your choosing. No Logo removes any logo from your site. 4. (Optional) For a custom logo, click the Browse button. The Open dialog box appears, allowing you to find your logo on your computer. 5. (Optional) In the Open dialog box, locate and select your logo image and then click the Open button. After a few moments, your custom logo uploads and appears on the Configure Site Logo screen. 6. Click the OK button to select your logo and return to your site settings. 7. Click the Preview button to view your new logo on your site in a new window. If you’re satisfied, close the window and click the Save Changes button. Otherwise, close the window and click Cancel. 109 Chapter 7: Customizing Your Site’s Look and Feel Adding Sidebar elements The Sidebar is a handy location to place links, countdown calendars, or other gadgets that you want to appear on all of your site’s pages. Some elements can help motivate people whereas others let you see how your project is progressing. To add a new Sidebar element, navigate to the Site Elements screen in your Site Settings, and then click the Add a Sidebar Item link on the left side of the page, as shown in Figure 7-6. Choose a Sidebar element from the screen that appears and click the Add button to attach it to the Sidebar. Figure 7-6: Add a new element to the Sidebar. When your Sidebar element appears in the list, click the Edit link to the right of the element name to start adjusting its settings. Here’s what each element does, as well as settings you can edit: ✓ Navigation: Shows links to popular pages on your site. To reorder pages to the Navigation box, click a page from the list that appears and then click the arrows to the right of the list. To delete a page, highlight the page in the list and then click the X box below the arrows on the right. To add a page, click the Add Page to Sidebar Navigation link. In the list that appears, highlight the page you want to add and click OK. You can then reorder the page to your liking. ✓ Text: Creates your own mini Web page with links, images, and so on. On the Configure Text Box screen, use the Edit toolbar to format your textbox to your liking, similar to Figure 7-7. Click OK when you’re done. 110 Part II: Constructing and Sharing Your Google Site If you have experience with HTML, click the HTML button to add other custom tags, styles, and so on. Sadly, you cannot insert